Whales and dolphins lead ‘human-like lives’ thanks to big brains, says study

The cultural brain hypothesis of human development could also explain cetaceans forming friendships and even gossiping

Life is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenose dolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Many cetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play.

That much scientists know. But in a new study, researchers compiled a list of the rich behaviours spotted in 90 different species of dolphins, whales and porpoises, and found that the bigger the species brain, the more complex indeed, the more human-like their lives are likely to be.

This suggests that the cultural brain hypothesis the theory that suggests our intelligence developed as a way of coping with large and complex social groups may apply to whales and dolphins, as well as humans.

Writing in the journal, Nature Ecology and Evolution, the researchers claim that complex social and cultural characteristics, such as hunting together, developing regional dialects and learning from observation, are linked to the expansion of the animals brains a process known as encephalisation.

The researchers gathered records of dolphins playing with humpback whales, helping fishermen with their catches, and even producing signature whistles for dolphins that are absent suggesting the animals may even gossip.

Another common behaviour was adult animals raising unrelated young. There is the saying that it takes a village to raise a child [and that] seems to be true for both whales and humans, said Michael Muthukrishna, an economic psychologist and co-author on the study at the London School of Economics.

Dolphins
Dolphins off the coast of South Africa. Photograph: Rainer Schimpf/Barcroft Media

Like humans, the cetaceans, a group made up of dolphins, whales and porpoises, are thought to do most of their learning socially rather than individually, which could explain why some species learn more complex behaviours than others. Those predominantly found alone or in small groups had the smallest brains, the researchers led by Susanne Shultz at the University of Manchester wrote.

Luke Rendell, a biologist at the University of St Andrews who was not involved in the study, but has done work on sperm whales and their distinctive dialects, warned against anthropomorphising and making animals appear to be like humans.

There is a risk of sounding like there is a single train line, with humans at the final station and other animals on their way of getting there. The truth is that every animal responds to their own evolutionary pressures, he said.

There is definitely a danger in comparing other animals to humans, especially with the data available. But what we can say for sure, is that this cultural-brain hypothesis we tested is present in primates and in cetaceans, Muthukrishna said.

There was still much more to learn, though, he added. Studies with underwater mammals are difficult and vastly underfunded, so there is so much we dont know about these fascinating animals, he said.

The fascination, however, should not only be interesting for people studying animals. We dont have to look at other planets to look for aliens, because we know that underwater there are these amazing species with so many parallels to us in their complex behaviours, said Muthukrishna.

Studying evolutionarily distinct animals such as cetaceans could act as a control group for studying intelligence in general, and so help the understanding of our own intellect.

It is interesting to think that whale and human brains are different in their structure but have brought us to the same patterns in behaviour, Rendell said. The extent of how this is close to humans can educate us about evolutionary forces in general.

However, Muthukrishna points out that intelligence is always driven by the environment an animal finds itself in. Each environment presents a different set of challenges for an animal. When you are above water, you learn how to tackle fire, for example, he said. As smart as whales are, they will never learn to light a spark.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Tourists Were Taking Selfies With A Baby Dolphin…And It Died As A Result

In Argentina, people lined up for what seemed like a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity with a baby dolphin, but their actions possibly ended the creature’s life.

After a person spotted a baby Franciscana dolphin close to the shore at a local beach, they took it out of the water so that people could take selfies with the animal. Allegedly, they kept it out of the water for too long, the dolphin overheated and died.

What’s worse is that this particular species is endangered.

People couldn’t resist the temptation of taking pictures, and their actions ultimately doomed the poor creature.

Baby dolphin dies after tourists ‘pull it out of ocean for selfies’

Posted by The Independent on Thursday, February 18, 2016

Various wildlife organizations have responded to the tragic incident.

It’s possible that the baby dolphin perished before the crowd got their hands on it (which is why it was so close to the shore or possibly washed ashore). Whether or not it was already dead, there is a lesson to be learned here: love our planet and give nature the distance and respect it deserves.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

River Dolphin Sonar Is Well-Suited For Life In The Busy Amazon

The echolocation clicks of toothy whales and dolphins typically encounter few obstacles at sea. Amazon river dolphins, on the other hand, live in shallow channels and flooded forests alongside dense vegetation confined environments where sonar operations might result in high levels of clutter and reverberation. According to new findings published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, these dolphins rely on a high-frequency, short-range biosonar.

Previous studies found that body size plays an important role in the evolution of toothed whale echolocation. Aarhus Universitys Michael Ladegaard and colleagues wanted to see if habitat shaped the evolution of their biosonar as well. They recorded the echolocation clicks of wild Amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis, also called botos) in three locations in the Amazon during October of 2013: near So Tom in Brazil, at the confluence of Rio Negro and Rio Solimes, and in the Mamirau Sustainable Development Reserve. The dolphins were recorded from small aluminum-hulled boats, and an array of seven hydrophones were deployed vertically as the team drove slowly ahead of the animals. The researchers recorded almost 35,000 echolocation clicks, of which 268 were recorded head-on and within 21 meters (70feet) of the equipment.

These river dolphins, the researchers discovered, produce soft, high-pitched echolocation clicks that lasted 14.1 microseconds with a brief interval of 35 microseconds between the clicks.

By increasing the frequency of their clicks, these freshwater dolphins could direct their sonar better than their ocean faring cousins. With soft, lower amplitude clicks, echoes only return from nearby objects. That means all of the echoes that they need to interpret return within milliseconds, Inside JEB explains, allowing them to produce high rates of about 30 clicks a second, while limiting reverberations.

Low-amplitude, highly directional biosonar systems, the team argues, are advantageous in riverine habitats because they simplify the auditory scene and help with target detection in cluttered, acoustically complex spaces.

Source: http://www.iflscience.com

Star of anti-dolphin killing film The Cove held by Japanese immigration

Ric OBarry seen in documentary about slaughter in a Japanese village says government is waging a war on dolphins

The star of Oscar-winning documentary The Cove, about the killing of dolphins in a village in Japan, has been detained by immigration authorities at Tokyos Narita international airport.

Ric OBarry an American known for training the dolphins used in the TV series Flipper said immigration officials told him he could not enter Japan on a tourist visa because he was not a tourist, according to his lawyer, Takashi Takano.

Takano said officials accused OBarry of having close ties with the anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd, which OBarry denies. Immigration officials said it was their policy not to comment on individual cases.

Takano said he was appealing against the detention, and that the Japanese government would decide on whether to allow OBarry into the country or deport him. It was not clear when a decision would be made.

The Cove, which won the 2009 Academy Award for best documentary, shows the slaughter of dolphins herded into a cove in the fishing village of Taiji and bludgeoned to death.

The Japanese government is cracking down on those who oppose their war on dolphins, OBarry said in a statement sent to the Associated Press through his son, Lincoln OBarry.

Officials in Taiji, a small fishing village in central Japan, and fishermen have defended the hunt as a tradition, saying that eating dolphin meat is no different to eating beef or chicken.

Most Japanese have never eaten dolphin meat. Many say they are horrified by the dolphin killing and there is a campaign against the Taiji hunt. Animal welfare activists say the hunt is driven mostly by the lucrative sale of dolphins to aquariums, with the income from the sale of meat simply an added extra.

OBarry has been stopped and questioned by Japanese immigration before. He has also been taken into custody by local police on the suspicion of not having proper travel documents before being released. But this is the first time he has been detained in this way. He has the support of high-profile celebrities, including Sting, the US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, and the former Guns N Roses drummer, Matt Sorum.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Dolphin Body Slams Boarder for Captive SeaWorld Brethren

Last week a stand-up paddleboarder was slammed off his board by a dolphin off the coast of Gracetown, Western Australia. Andrew Hill told Seven News he was paddling out when a pod of dolphins caught an incoming wave. The video was captured by onlooker Lucas Englert.

In regards to the headline, the Sifter clarifies that while the intention is not clear, it would be amazing if true :P

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

Paddleboarder ruthlessly taken down by a reckless dolphin

You never realize just how large dolphins are till one of them body-slams you. 

Andrew Hill, an Australian paddleboarder, came face-to-face (er, body-to-body?) with a dolphin while boarding off the coast of Gracetown, West Australia.

The moment was captured by photographer Lucas Englert, the man behind surfing Instagram account lubricatedsurf. Englert was getting ready to film some surfers when he caught footage of Hill’s encounter with the small pod of dolphins. 

The group of eight or nine dolphins decided to catch the same wave as Hill. As the wave picked up, one of the dolphins leapt out of the water and crashed right into the paddleboarder and knock him right off the board. 

But don’t fear — Hill told 7News Perth that the injury was no worse than what he’s experienced playing rugby.

“Hats off to him,” said Hill about the dolphin. “He collected me really well.”

Presumably, “collected” means something like a tackle in Australia?

Either way, hats off to them both. 

Want more clever culture writing beamed directly to your inbox? Sign up here for the twice-weekly Click Click Click newsletter. It’s fun – we promise.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Don’t call it a wholphin: first sighting of rare whale-dolphin hybrid

Scientists have identified a creature that they believe to be a hybrid of a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin

Scientists are touting the first sighting of a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin in the ocean off Hawaii. But dont call it a wholphin, they say.

The melon-headed whale is one of the various species thats called a whale but is technically a dolphin.

Calling it something like a wholphin doesnt make any sense, said one of the studys authors, Robin Baird, a Hawaii research biologist with Washington state-based Cascadia Research Collective. I think calling it a wholphin just confuses the situation more than it already is.

In a study published last week, scientists say the animal spotted off the island of Kauai in August 2017 appears to be the first record of a hybrid involving either species. Its also only the third confirmed instance of a wild-born hybrid between species in the Delphinidae family.

The label wholphin has stuck for a hybrid born in 1985 at Hawaiis Sea Life Park of a false killer whale and an Atlantic bottle-nose dolphin. The hybrid named Kekaimalu still lives at the marine mammal park, where she helps teach children about genetics. News of the hybrid spotted in the wild during navy-funded research to study the effects of sonar, proves the genetic diversity of the ocean, said Sea Life park curator Jeff Pawloski. To know she has cousins out there in the ocean is an amazing thing to know.

While some news organisations have described the melon-headed whale and rough-toothed dolphin hybrid as a new species, in order for that to happen other things need to occur, including more widespread hybridisation, Baird said.

That isnt the case, although there are examples where hybridisation has resulted in a new species, he said. Theres no evidence to suggest its leading toward anything like species formation.

The male hybrid presents an opportunity to look for others. Hybrids generally occur when there is a decline in the population in one of the parental species, so scientists will be looking out for such a decline.

A likely scenario for how the hybrid came to be is a melon-headed whale getting separated from its group and ending up traveling with rough-toothed dolphins.
Scientists do not know how old it is, but believe it is close to adult age.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Dolphin Succulents Are The Latest Craze In Japan

Remember the bunny succulent plants? If you liked those you’re in for a real treat because someone just shared a pic of succulent plants that look like dolphins and the Japanese are going crazy about them!

Called the Senecio peregrinus, this plant has a bunch of tiny leaves that look like little dolphins jumping in the air. The best part? The longer the vines get, the more the leaves look like dolphins! So, not only does the plant make your home cozier but it’s pretty adorable as well.

Twitter user @kao77neko shared a picture of this succulent and it has over 10k retweets and 11k likes since. Thank you @kao77neko, for introducing us to this awesome dolphin plant that we never knew we loved!

(h/t)

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: itsasucculentworld

Image credits: kao77neko

Source: http://www.boredpanda.com/

Rare Pink Dolphin Spotted in Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Redit user sloshyjacob recently shared a series of amazing photos his friend took of ‘Pinkie’ a rare pink dolphin known to frequent the waters of Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana.

For those wondering how a dolphin can possibly find its way and survive in a fresh water lake, Calcasieu connects to the Gulf of Mexico and actually consists of brackish or briny water which has more salinity than fresh water but not as much as seawater.

“Pinkie” is an albino bottlenose dolphin that was first spotted on June 24, 2007 by charter boat captain Erik Rue.

More recent sightings from 2015 captured “Pinkie” mating, confirming that the dolphin was female.
 
[via sloshyjacob on reddit]

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

‘Not ashamed’: dolphin hunters of Taiji break silence over film The Cove

Members of the tiny Japanese community, which was vilified in the 2009 documentary, speak to the Guardian about fishing and their unique way of life

Taiji is still in darkness when a dozen men gather at the quayside and warm themselves over a brazier. While the rest of the town sleeps, they sip from cans of hot coffee, smoke cigarettes and talk in hushed tones.

As soon as the sun edges above the peninsula, they take to their boats, steering out to sea in formation in search of their prey: the dolphin.

It has been eight years since the Oscar-winning film The Cove propelled this community in an isolated corner of Japans Pacific coast to the centre of a bitter debate over the pursuit of dolphins for human consumption and entertainment.

The films graphic footage of dolphins being slaughtered with knives, turning the surrounding sea a crimson red, shocked audiences around the world.

Unaccustomed to international attention and wrong-footed by their social media-savvy opponents, the towns 3,200 residents simply went to ground. Requests for interviews with town officials went unanswered; the fishermen took a vow of silence.

But after years of keeping their counsel, Taijis fishermen have finally spoken out, agreeing to talk to the Guardian about their work, their whaling heritage, and their determination to continue hunting dolphins.

Weve mostly stayed silent since The Cove, and thats why our point of view was never put across in the media, says Yoshifumi Kai, a senior official with Taijis fisheries cooperative.

Taijis
Taijis dolphin hunters head out to sea Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

Kai attributes that reticence down to what he claims are attempts by activists from Sea Shepherd and other conservation groups to manufacture confrontations, which they film and post online, and challenges claims that the practice of slaughtering dolphins beneath tarpaulin sheets is proof that he and his fellow fishermen have something to hide.

Activists say we are concealing something because we know that what we are doing is immoral, but thats nonsense, he says. You never see cattle or other animals being slaughtered in public. Its not something you do out in the open.

The earliest recorded coastal whale hunts in Taiji can be traced back to the early 1600s. Scrolls on display in the towns whale museum depict dozens of boats decorated with symbols taken from Buddhism and Japans indigenous religion, Shinto, in pursuit of a whale big enough to sustain the entire community for months.

Foreign activists ask us why we kill these cute animals, but we see them as a vital source of food, even now, says Taijis mayor, Kazutaka Sangen. When I was a boy, a third of the town would turn out to greet a whale being brought back to shore, because they were desperate to eat its meat. We are grateful to the whales we want Westerners to understand that.

Taiji Japan map

By killing dolphins and other small whales, fishermen are continuing a tradition that enabled their ancestors to survive before the days of mass transport and the availability of other sources of nutrition, adds Sangen.

We couldnt grow rice or vegetables here, and we had no natural water supply. We needed to kill whales to eat, and hundreds of people died doing so. This was a very difficult place to survive, and we will always be grateful to our ancestors for their sacrifice. Its because of them that we are all here today.

For Sangen, everything in Taiji from services for elderly residents to education and tourist infrastructure depends on the income it makes from the sale of dolphins to zoos and aquariums. Several times during the interview he refers to kujira no megumi literally, the blessing of the whale. Whaling enables this town to function, he says.

Using remote-controlled helicopters and hidden underwater cameras, The Cove provided graphic footage of Taijis infamous drive hunts, whose critics include the former US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy.

Typically, fishermen pursue pods of dolphins across open seas, banging metal poles against their boats to confuse their hypersensitive sonar, before herding them into a narrow inlet. There, they are either slaughtered for their meat or selected and sold for large sums to aquariums and marine parks.

While dolphin meat for human consumption generates only modest profits, Taijis fishermen can reportedly sell a live specimen to brokers for about 8,000 US dollars. A fully trained dolphin can then fetch more than 40,000 US dollars if sold overseas, and about half that in Japan.

Minke
Minke whale sashimi served at a restaurant in Taiji Photograph: Justin McCurry

The 20 or so Taiji fishermen who take to the sea between September and April to hunt bottlenose dolphins, pilot whales and other small cetaceans have been emboldened by the release of Okujirasama (A Whale of a Tale) a documentary by the New York-based filmmaker Megumi Sasaki that counters what she describes as The Coves one-sided treatment of a complex issue.

While making her film, Sasaki concluded that the debate over Taiji is an irreconcilable clash of cultures between the global, and Western-led, animal rights movement and local traditions steeped in religion and ancestor worship.

Whaling is the glue that holds this town together

If dolphins are so important to the local community, then why kill them thats what many Westerners cant understand, Sasaki says. But we think of animals as a resource, not that they are special creatures that can do things humans cant do. Its a totally different way of thinking. Whaling is the glue that holds this town together its inseparable from local identity and pride.

Kai dismisses claims that that he and other fishermen employ a singularly cruel method to kill the dolphins. The way we work has changed with the times, he says. In response to criticism, fishermen now dispatch the animals by inserting a knife into their neck, severing their brain stem a method he claims is the most humane possible, but which some experts have said does not result in a painless or immediate death.

On a recent morning, the seafront in Taiji is free from confrontation, although activists have tweeted their regular early-morning photos of the banger boats heading out to sea.

The fishermen appear to have reached an uneasy truce with overseas campaigners, first from Sea Shepherd, and now from the Dolphin Project, a group formed by the dolphin trainer-turned activist Ric OBarry.

Warning
Warning signs near the cove in Taiji. Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

But there is still little interaction between the two sides. They dont want to listen, only to provoke us, Mitsunori Kobata, president of Taijis dolphin-hunting association, says over a dinner of minke whale sashimi and steamed rice flavoured with thin strips of whale blubber.

Theyre here to do whatever they can to obstruct our business, so we dont see any point in engaging with them. Theyre never going to change their minds, whatever we say.

Pointing to slices of sauted meat, from the belly of a short-finned pilot whale, that he has brought from home, Kobata adds: In the days when there was no refrigeration, people preserved meat like this in salt. Of course, there are lots of other sources of protein around these days, but people of my generation and older still have the right to eat whale if we want to.

Both men hope Sasakis documentary will restore some equilibrium to a debate that has cast a shadow over Taiji for almost a decade.

They point out that they kill just under 2,000 small cetaceans a year, a tenth of Japans annual quota, adding that none of the species is endangered or covered by the 1986 global moratorium on commercial whaling.

Were not ashamed of hunting dolphins and would never consider stopping, Kai says. Its the most important part of our local tradition.

Just look around you if we didnt make a living from the sea, there would be nothing left. People keep telling us to stop whaling and find another way of earning a living. But what on earth would we do instead?

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Stunning Footage Captures The Incredible Moment A Dolphin Gives Birth To Her Calf

Katrl, a Pacific white-sided dolphin living at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium, recently gave birth to a calf. A sight that has never been observed in the wild for this particular species of dolphins, much less ever having been filmed!

After three hours of intense labor, the mixture of nervous and excited chatter from onlookers gave way to gasps and applause as the newborn dolphin calf wriggled with the kick, kick, kick of its tiny tail to the tank’s surface and took its very first breath of air.

Witness the miracle of life unfold in the video below, and don’t worry, it’s not too graphic!

The as-yet-unnamed calf is the first for 29-year-old mother Katrl and it increases the relatively small population of the Pacific white-sided dolphins in North American zoos and aquariums to 16.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

Dolphin Steals Womans iPad; Is Sick of Your Selfies

A dolphin at Seaworld Orlando was filmed stealing an iPad right out a woman’s hand. “That’s what you get for keeping me in captivity,” the iPad stealing dolphin said in an interview with the Sifter.

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

Tourists Were Taking Selfies With A Baby Dolphin…And It Died As A Result

In Argentina, people lined up for what seemed like a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity with a baby dolphin, but their actions possibly ended the creature’s life.

After a person spotted a baby Franciscana dolphin close to the shore at a local beach, they took it out of the water so that people could take selfies with the animal. Allegedly, they kept it out of the water for too long, the dolphin overheated and died.

What’s worse is that this particular species is endangered.

People couldn’t resist the temptation of taking pictures, and their actions ultimately doomed the poor creature.

Baby dolphin dies after tourists ‘pull it out of ocean for selfies’

Posted by The Independent on Thursday, February 18, 2016

Various wildlife organizations have responded to the tragic incident.

It’s possible that the baby dolphin perished before the crowd got their hands on it (which is why it was so close to the shore or possibly washed ashore). Whether or not it was already dead, there is a lesson to be learned here: love our planet and give nature the distance and respect it deserves.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

Surfer is super pumped to be body slammed by a dolphin

Seems like all you can do is laugh when you get whacked by a dolphin.

Surfer Sam Yoon was ecstatic when he was knocked off his board by the aquatic mammal off Duranbah Beach, in Australia’s Tweed Heads. The dolphin was leaping in front of a wave and collided with Yoon as it dived back into the water.

“You see that? It landed on my head, shoulders and the back. It was like, full on,” Yoon told 9 News Thursday, while reacting to iPhone footage of the collision.

Image: 9 NEws

The animal can be seen trying to avoid Yoon, tilting to its right mid-air. Yoon tried to get out of the way too, but it was too late.

“I knew that he realised he’s gotta do something too. I was like, f*ck this, no way I can get away from this,” he laughed.

Yoon was not injured, and kept surfing after the collision occurred. He thinks the dolphins might’ve communicated with each other after the incident, avoiding him every time he was paddling.

That’s one cool surfing story to tell the mates, we admit.

Source: http://mashable.com/

This beached baby dolphin was rescued by an NBC reporter

Reporters tend to keep their distance from the story, but when a baby dolphin needed help, one reporter rose to the occasion.

NBC News reporter Kerry Sanders helped rescue a stranded baby dolphin on Marco Island, Florida during a storm surge caused by Hurricane Irma. Sanders’ rescue attempt was broadcast live on Today.

Today reports that the dolphin had been brought back to the beach by a local after being found washed all the way to a sidewalk.

Sanders reports the surges as measuring 4 feet, enough to wash wildlife ashore. After finding the exhausted dolphin on the beach, Sanders teamed up with a passing tourist to help it back into the Gulf of Mexico.

The baby dolphin, who proved pretty heavy for two grown men to deliver back to the ocean, was nursed and carried into the oncoming waves — not an easy hurdle for a tired baby dolphin to tackle.

It took about 10-15 minutes for the pair to get the dolphin into deep enough water for it to gain supported swimming momentum.

Sanders stands on the shore cheering the dolphin on. “Come on buddy, you can do it,” he cheers. “It’s a struggle. I see him trying, he really wants to make it out there, he’s just really disoriented no doubt.”

Sanders came across several other dolphins along the beach, including an adult needing a group of local Florida residents to assist in its rescue:

Today pointed out Sanders’ lengthy career in hurricane reporting (he’s covered over 60) and the fact that he’s been part of dolphin rescue stories before, so serendipitously, he knew how to perform a rescue.

Precisely where Sanders was standing hours earlier, a group of Florida residents rescued yet another dolphin, picked up by Fox 4:

Looks like Sanders has started something.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Dolphins hydroplaning at super speed will make you want to be a dolphin

Just when you thought dolphins couldn’t get any smarter or cooler, they show up every other animal in the kingdom and hydroplane like the speed demons they are.

In this video uploaded to Youtube by BBC Earth, dolphins in Western Australia hunt for fish by zooming along the shoreline in the most majestic, speedy fashion.

According to the video, dolphins usually stun their prey by slapping it with their tails. But for these dolphins, the fish are just a bit out of reach. So to capture their dinner, they wind up by vigorously pumping their tails to gain speed, and then hydroplane at super speed to grab the fish.

No, the video isn’t sped up – those guys are really going that fast.

There’s little room for error because if this strategy goes south for the dolphins, they could end up stranded on the shore.

But life in the ocean works as it does on land – “fortune favors the brave.”

Source: http://mashable.com/

Star of dolphin-hunting film The Cove to be deported from Japan

Ric OBarry is accused of trying to enter the country using tourist visa to join campaign against slaughter of dolphins in Taiji

A leading US animal rights activist is to be deported from Japan after being accused of trying to enter on a tourist visa to support a campaign against the slaughter of dolphins.

Ric OBarry, who starred in The Cove, the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary about the annual dolphin cull in the town of Taiji, has been detained at Narita airport near Tokyo since Monday.

His son, Lincoln OBarry, said immigration authorities had turned down his fathers request to visit Japan using a tourist visa. They reportedly accused him of lying during questioning and of having links to the marine conservation group Sea Shepherd, whose members have a constant presence in Taiji.

The 76-year-old, who trained dolphins for the 1960s TV series Flipper before devoting himself to conservation, reportedly denied the charges, saying he was going to observe dolphins as a tourist.

Taiji, on Japans Pacific coast, gained international notoriety as a result of The Cove, which followed OBarry and other activists as they attempted to document the killing of dolphins by local fishermen. The film, directed by Louie Psihoyos, won the Academy Award for best documentary.

The method used to kill the animals has been widely condemned by environmentalists. The US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, has also voiced deep concern about the drive-hunt method.

Fishermen pursue pods of dolphins and bang metal poles together beneath the water to confuse their hypersensitive sonar. The dolphins are then driven into a large cove sealed off by nets, and taken to a secluded inlet to be killed with knives and spears.

Last year, aquariums in Japan voted to stop buying live dolphins from Taiji after they were threatened with expulsion from the worlds leading zoo organisation. Taijis mayor, Kazutaka Sangen, later said the town would set up a new body that would continue to sell dolphins to aquariums.

OBarry, who heads the Dolphin Project campaign group, is a regular visitor to Taiji, where fishermen catch hundreds of dolphins during the six-month season, which starts in September. The most attractive specimens, usually bottlenoses, are sold to aquariums and sea parks, while others are killed and their meat sold in local restaurants and supermarkets.

In an email to his son seen by the Associated Press, OBarry said: Im incarcerated, on trumped-up charges. In a world where so much that is wild and free has already been lost to us, we must leave these beautiful dolphins free to swim as they will and must.

Fishermen

Fishermen drive bottlenose dolphins into a net during the annual hunt off Taiji, Japan. Photograph: AP

Media reports said OBarry was resisting deportation and had been transferred to another detention facility near Narita airport. His lawyer Takashi Takano visited him on Friday and said OBarry was being held alone but was in good spirits.

The Japanese government was expected to issue a formal warrant and physically deport him, Takano added.

The deportation order marks a hardening of attitudes among Japanese authorities towards environmental activists in Taiji. Police have increased their presence in the town in case of clashes between Sea Shepherd members and locals, who claim they are being unfairly vilified for maintaining a coastal whaling and dolphin-hunting tradition stretching back centuries.

OBarry was arrested near the town last September for allegedly failing to carry his passport, but was released the following day.

Takano said immigration officials refused to believe OBarrys claim that he was not planning to participate in any campaigns. They cited his presence last August at Japan Dolphins Day in Tokyo, despite having told them he would not attend the event.

Immigration officials said they were unable to comment on individual cases.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

This disturbing dolphin selfie trend is an all-time low for humanity

Image: screengrab/youtube

Could people please stop dragging dolphins from the water in order to take selfies with them?

Another baby dolphin has died in Argentina after tourists ripped it from the ocean and mobbed it to touch it and take snaps with it.

A YouTube video shows beachgoers in San Bernardo, about 200 miles south of Buenos Aires, standing and kneeling to pet the small animal.

“They let it die,” Claudia, one observer quoted in the newspaper La Capital told C5N news channel. “It was young and came to the shore. They could have returned it to the water, in fact, it was breathing, but everyone started taking photos and touching it. They said it was already dead.”

It’s the second such incident in Argentina over the past year. A similar episode happened last year when a young dolphin was mobbed and left for dead in the resort of Santa Teresita.

h/t National Geographic

Source: http://mashable.com/

Rare dolphin dies after beachgoers pass it around for selfies

At least one of two rare La Plata dolphins died after beachgoers in Argentina took them ashore to snap some selfies.

The dolphin died from dehydration after people passed it around so they could take pictures with it.

La Plata dolphins are considered vulnerable,and their population is in decline, although exact numbers remain unclear. Although they are one of the worlds smallest species of dolphins, they can live to be 20 years old and are highly intelligent.

It should go without saying that animals should not be removed from their homesespecially in the waterfor the sake of a cute picture or a closer look. Doing so can not only kill the animal but also, if it is rare enough, threaten its entire species.

Even approaching animals in their natural environment can cause them stress. Over time, if enough people unintentionally traumatize an animal, such encounters can lead to death by a thousand cuts.

Researchers who study wild marine animals carefully monitor the stress levels of animals they capture and release. Even those encounters can cause some stress.

If people in boats repeatedly approach an animal, it must expend considerable energy simply trying to escape, thus burning more calories than it normally would and requiring more food than normal. Higher-than-average food intake can be a problem because a roaming mammal in the open ocean is not guaranteed a large food supply. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationrecommendsthat people keep their distance and that they don’t pursue animals they encounter in the water or on the beach.

The agency also warns people not to feed, touch, or attract any animals. Everyone should be familiar with the basics of any wildlife they might encounter on a trip. Simply Googling the location one is planning to visit often yields basic safety information that can save the life of the travelerand that of the possibly endangered animal.

Photo by Hernan Coria/Facebook

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

Paddleboarder ruthlessly taken down by a reckless dolphin

You never realize just how large dolphins are till one of them body-slams you. 

Andrew Hill, an Australian paddleboarder, came face-to-face (er, body-to-body?) with a dolphin while boarding off the coast of Gracetown, West Australia.

The moment was captured by photographer Lucas Englert, the man behind surfing Instagram account lubricatedsurf. Englert was getting ready to film some surfers when he caught footage of Hill’s encounter with the small pod of dolphins. 

The group of eight or nine dolphins decided to catch the same wave as Hill. As the wave picked up, one of the dolphins leapt out of the water and crashed right into the paddleboarder and knock him right off the board. 

But don’t fear — Hill told 7News Perth that the injury was no worse than what he’s experienced playing rugby.

“Hats off to him,” said Hill about the dolphin. “He collected me really well.”

Presumably, “collected” means something like a tackle in Australia?

Either way, hats off to them both. 

Want more clever culture writing beamed directly to your inbox? Sign up here for the twice-weekly Click Click Click newsletter. It’s fun – we promise.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Dolphin Body Slams Boarder for Captive SeaWorld Brethren

Last week a stand-up paddleboarder was slammed off his board by a dolphin off the coast of Gracetown, Western Australia. Andrew Hill told Seven News he was paddling out when a pod of dolphins caught an incoming wave. The video was captured by onlooker Lucas Englert.

In regards to the headline, the Sifter clarifies that while the intention is not clear, it would be amazing if true :P

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

Selfie-Crazed Beachgoers Kill Rare Dolphin

A mob of beachgoers desperate to take photos with two small dolphins killed at least one of the animals on a beach in Buenos Aires last week.

“This is more than upsetting,” Lori Marino, executive director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy, told The Huffington Post in an email. “It is an indictment of how our species treats other animals — as objects for our benefit, as props, as things with value only in relation to us. This is a terribly painful story but it goes on, writ large, every day all over the world.”

Marino identified the dolphin seen being passed around in now-infamous images as an infant. Disturbing footage reportedly from the same incident shows someone pulling a dolphin out of the water and placing it on land as people crowd around.

The Foundation Vida Silvestre, a group that represents the World Wildlife Fund in Argentina, said in a statement that two dolphins were pulled from the water, and confirmed that at least one of the animals died. It identified the creatures as Franciscana dolphins — also known as La Plata dolphins.

Hernan Coria, who posted images of the situation to his Facebook account, called the incident a “shame” and said he did not believe the dolphins were alive. Despite his clear disapproval, Coria is receiving an onslaught of online hate over the photos — probably from people who did not read his caption.

Since dolphins are mammals — and therefore breathe air — some people may be under the mistaken impression that they can survive when held out of the water. This is not the case.

As Vida Silvestre noted, dolphins cannot remain out of the water long because their skin dehydrates and they overheat.

“They aren’t able to regulate their temperature when they come out of the water,” Marino told HuffPost, explaining that underwater, the animals lose much more heat than they do when out of the water. In fact, dolphins don’t even have to be totally out of the water to suffer from overheating.

“We also see this in theme parks when there’s no shade,” she said. “If they’re not spending enough time under the water, then you see [overheating].”

Additionally, the bodies of dolphins, porpoises and whales aren’t designed to support themselves outside of the buoyancy of the water. Being out of the water — whether stranded on land or being held up by human beings– can cause the animals’ rib cage to collapse, causing serious organ damage. And the stress alone from being yanked from the water and manhandled can cause cardiac arrest — as is seen when dolphins are captured from the wild.

If beachgoers find a dolphin that seems stranded, the best course of action is to alert the proper authorities, while keeping the animal floated in the water and its skin wet. Keep any touching to a minimum, in order to avoid the risk of spreading human diseases to the creature, Marino said.

Ultimately, Marino believes that a worldview that treats animals as mere entertainment — and not living beings that demand respect — is what led to the dolphin’s death.

“We use them to adorn our lives, and we, literally, throw them away like garbage when we’re finished using them,” she said.

Irina Ivanova contributed translation. 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

They didn’t flip: Ukraine claims dolphin army captured by Russia went on hunger strike

Russia captured the dolphins in 2014 and says the trained mammals refused interact with coaches or eat

Ukraine is home to some of the more adventurous military blue-sky thinking, mostly hangovers from the Soviet era. As well as a 160-metre high, 500-metre long radar that was supposed to be able to warn of nuclear attack, it also has a secret programme that trains sea mammals to carry out military tasks. Ukraine has a dolphin army at the Crimean military dolphin centre, trained and ready for deployment.

Or at least it did, but after the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014, the dolphins were captured. Ukraine demanded their return, but Russian forces refused. Some believed the Russians were planning to retrain the dolphins as Russian soldiers, with a source telling Russian agency RIA Novosti that engineers were developing new aquarium technologies for new programmes to more efficiently use dolphins underwater.

Four years later and it seems little has come of these supposed Russian plans and most of the dolphins have died. But this week Boris Babin, the Ukrainian governments representative in Crimea, claimed that they did so defending their country. He said that the dolphins died patriotically, refusing to follow orders or eat food provided by the Russian invaders and that the hunger strike led to their eventual death.

Play Video
0:52

Combat dolphins and navy sea lions: meet the military sea mammals video report

He told the Ukranian Obozrevatel newspaper that the dolphins were more honourable than some human soldiers: The trained animals refused not only to interact with the new Russian coaches, but refused food and died some time later. Many Ukrainian soldiers took their oath and loyalty much less seriously than these dolphins.

Others have since denied the claims and blamed Ukraine for their poor treatment of the dolphins. On the Russian-owned radio station Sputnik, Ukrainian politician Vladimir Oleinik claimed that politicians in Kiev are always looking to blame the hand of Moscow when sober-minded people can see this is just propaganda and rumours, and that the dolphins were not especially looked after under any regime.

Russian Duma deputy Dmitry Belik has since claimed, rather less excitingly, that all the combat dolphins that served in the naval forces of Ukraine were sold to commercial entities or died of natural causes before 2014. He said there is no question of any Ukrainian patriotism because Ukraine had already demilitarised the dolphins, and for some time they had only engaged in commercial activities.

Dolphins have been observed displaying similar loyal characteristics to dogs, swimming up enthusiastically to people that they have met before. Occasionally captive dolphins have been known to refuse food when a tank companion dies and there have also been claims that dolphins have stopped themselves breathing after being separated from humans they had formed a bond with. So perhaps the Ukrainian claims arent as far-fetched as they sound.

There is plenty of disinformation floating around, and it is difficult to independently verify what really went on at a secret dolphin training facility in Crimea. We do know that in 2016, Russians put out a public tender to purchase five dolphins and eventually bought them from Moscows Utrish Dolphinarium although they never explained why. Perhaps they thought they could persuade their existing pod of Ukrainian dolphins to switch sides.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Dolphin Succulents Are The Latest Craze In Japan

Remember the bunny succulent plants? If you liked those you’re in for a real treat because someone just shared a pic of succulent plants that look like dolphins and the Japanese are going crazy about them!

Called the Senecio peregrinus, this plant has a bunch of tiny leaves that look like little dolphins jumping in the air. The best part? The longer the vines get, the more the leaves look like dolphins! So, not only does the plant make your home cozier but it’s pretty adorable as well.

Twitter user @kao77neko shared a picture of this succulent and it has over 10k retweets and 11k likes since. Thank you @kao77neko, for introducing us to this awesome dolphin plant that we never knew we loved!

(h/t)

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: kao77neko

Image credits: itsasucculentworld

Image credits: kao77neko

Source: http://www.boredpanda.com/

Rare Pink Dolphin Spotted in Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Redit user sloshyjacob recently shared a series of amazing photos his friend took of ‘Pinkie’ a rare pink dolphin known to frequent the waters of Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana.

For those wondering how a dolphin can possibly find its way and survive in a fresh water lake, Calcasieu connects to the Gulf of Mexico and actually consists of brackish or briny water which has more salinity than fresh water but not as much as seawater.

“Pinkie” is an albino bottlenose dolphin that was first spotted on June 24, 2007 by charter boat captain Erik Rue.

More recent sightings from 2015 captured “Pinkie” mating, confirming that the dolphin was female.
 
[via sloshyjacob on reddit]

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

‘Not ashamed’: dolphin hunters of Taiji break silence over film The Cove

Members of the tiny Japanese community, which was vilified in the 2009 documentary, speak to the Guardian about fishing and their unique way of life

Taiji is still in darkness when a dozen men gather at the quayside and warm themselves over a brazier. While the rest of the town sleeps, they sip from cans of hot coffee, smoke cigarettes and talk in hushed tones.

As soon as the sun edges above the peninsula, they take to their boats, steering out to sea in formation in search of their prey: the dolphin.

It has been eight years since the Oscar-winning film The Cove propelled this community in an isolated corner of Japans Pacific coast to the centre of a bitter debate over the pursuit of dolphins for human consumption and entertainment.

The films graphic footage of dolphins being slaughtered with knives, turning the surrounding sea a crimson red, shocked audiences around the world.

Unaccustomed to international attention and wrong-footed by their social media-savvy opponents, the towns 3,200 residents simply went to ground. Requests for interviews with town officials went unanswered; the fishermen took a vow of silence.

But after years of keeping their counsel, Taijis fishermen have finally spoken out, agreeing to talk to the Guardian about their work, their whaling heritage, and their determination to continue hunting dolphins.

Weve mostly stayed silent since The Cove, and thats why our point of view was never put across in the media, says Yoshifumi Kai, a senior official with Taijis fisheries cooperative.

Taijis
Taijis dolphin hunters head out to sea Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

Kai attributes that reticence down to what he claims are attempts by activists from Sea Shepherd and other conservation groups to manufacture confrontations, which they film and post online, and challenges claims that the practice of slaughtering dolphins beneath tarpaulin sheets is proof that he and his fellow fishermen have something to hide.

Activists say we are concealing something because we know that what we are doing is immoral, but thats nonsense, he says. You never see cattle or other animals being slaughtered in public. Its not something you do out in the open.

The earliest recorded coastal whale hunts in Taiji can be traced back to the early 1600s. Scrolls on display in the towns whale museum depict dozens of boats decorated with symbols taken from Buddhism and Japans indigenous religion, Shinto, in pursuit of a whale big enough to sustain the entire community for months.

Foreign activists ask us why we kill these cute animals, but we see them as a vital source of food, even now, says Taijis mayor, Kazutaka Sangen. When I was a boy, a third of the town would turn out to greet a whale being brought back to shore, because they were desperate to eat its meat. We are grateful to the whales we want Westerners to understand that.

Taiji Japan map

By killing dolphins and other small whales, fishermen are continuing a tradition that enabled their ancestors to survive before the days of mass transport and the availability of other sources of nutrition, adds Sangen.

We couldnt grow rice or vegetables here, and we had no natural water supply. We needed to kill whales to eat, and hundreds of people died doing so. This was a very difficult place to survive, and we will always be grateful to our ancestors for their sacrifice. Its because of them that we are all here today.

For Sangen, everything in Taiji from services for elderly residents to education and tourist infrastructure depends on the income it makes from the sale of dolphins to zoos and aquariums. Several times during the interview he refers to kujira no megumi literally, the blessing of the whale. Whaling enables this town to function, he says.

Using remote-controlled helicopters and hidden underwater cameras, The Cove provided graphic footage of Taijis infamous drive hunts, whose critics include the former US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy.

Typically, fishermen pursue pods of dolphins across open seas, banging metal poles against their boats to confuse their hypersensitive sonar, before herding them into a narrow inlet. There, they are either slaughtered for their meat or selected and sold for large sums to aquariums and marine parks.

While dolphin meat for human consumption generates only modest profits, Taijis fishermen can reportedly sell a live specimen to brokers for about 8,000 US dollars. A fully trained dolphin can then fetch more than 40,000 US dollars if sold overseas, and about half that in Japan.

Minke
Minke whale sashimi served at a restaurant in Taiji Photograph: Justin McCurry

The 20 or so Taiji fishermen who take to the sea between September and April to hunt bottlenose dolphins, pilot whales and other small cetaceans have been emboldened by the release of Okujirasama (A Whale of a Tale) a documentary by the New York-based filmmaker Megumi Sasaki that counters what she describes as The Coves one-sided treatment of a complex issue.

While making her film, Sasaki concluded that the debate over Taiji is an irreconcilable clash of cultures between the global, and Western-led, animal rights movement and local traditions steeped in religion and ancestor worship.

Whaling is the glue that holds this town together

If dolphins are so important to the local community, then why kill them thats what many Westerners cant understand, Sasaki says. But we think of animals as a resource, not that they are special creatures that can do things humans cant do. Its a totally different way of thinking. Whaling is the glue that holds this town together its inseparable from local identity and pride.

Kai dismisses claims that that he and other fishermen employ a singularly cruel method to kill the dolphins. The way we work has changed with the times, he says. In response to criticism, fishermen now dispatch the animals by inserting a knife into their neck, severing their brain stem a method he claims is the most humane possible, but which some experts have said does not result in a painless or immediate death.

On a recent morning, the seafront in Taiji is free from confrontation, although activists have tweeted their regular early-morning photos of the banger boats heading out to sea.

The fishermen appear to have reached an uneasy truce with overseas campaigners, first from Sea Shepherd, and now from the Dolphin Project, a group formed by the dolphin trainer-turned activist Ric OBarry.

Warning
Warning signs near the cove in Taiji. Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

But there is still little interaction between the two sides. They dont want to listen, only to provoke us, Mitsunori Kobata, president of Taijis dolphin-hunting association, says over a dinner of minke whale sashimi and steamed rice flavoured with thin strips of whale blubber.

Theyre here to do whatever they can to obstruct our business, so we dont see any point in engaging with them. Theyre never going to change their minds, whatever we say.

Pointing to slices of sauted meat, from the belly of a short-finned pilot whale, that he has brought from home, Kobata adds: In the days when there was no refrigeration, people preserved meat like this in salt. Of course, there are lots of other sources of protein around these days, but people of my generation and older still have the right to eat whale if we want to.

Both men hope Sasakis documentary will restore some equilibrium to a debate that has cast a shadow over Taiji for almost a decade.

They point out that they kill just under 2,000 small cetaceans a year, a tenth of Japans annual quota, adding that none of the species is endangered or covered by the 1986 global moratorium on commercial whaling.

Were not ashamed of hunting dolphins and would never consider stopping, Kai says. Its the most important part of our local tradition.

Just look around you if we didnt make a living from the sea, there would be nothing left. People keep telling us to stop whaling and find another way of earning a living. But what on earth would we do instead?

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Stunning Footage Captures The Incredible Moment A Dolphin Gives Birth To Her Calf

Katrl, a Pacific white-sided dolphin living at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium, recently gave birth to a calf. A sight that has never been observed in the wild for this particular species of dolphins, much less ever having been filmed!

After three hours of intense labor, the mixture of nervous and excited chatter from onlookers gave way to gasps and applause as the newborn dolphin calf wriggled with the kick, kick, kick of its tiny tail to the tank’s surface and took its very first breath of air.

Witness the miracle of life unfold in the video below, and don’t worry, it’s not too graphic!

The as-yet-unnamed calf is the first for 29-year-old mother Katrl and it increases the relatively small population of the Pacific white-sided dolphins in North American zoos and aquariums to 16.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

This beached baby dolphin was rescued by an NBC reporter

Reporters tend to keep their distance from the story, but when a baby dolphin needed help, one reporter rose to the occasion.

NBC News reporter Kerry Sanders helped rescue a stranded baby dolphin on Marco Island, Florida during a storm surge caused by Hurricane Irma. Sanders’ rescue attempt was broadcast live on Today.

Today reports that the dolphin had been brought back to the beach by a local after being found washed all the way to a sidewalk.

Sanders reports the surges as measuring 4 feet, enough to wash wildlife ashore. After finding the exhausted dolphin on the beach, Sanders teamed up with a passing tourist to help it back into the Gulf of Mexico.

The baby dolphin, who proved pretty heavy for two grown men to deliver back to the ocean, was nursed and carried into the oncoming waves — not an easy hurdle for a tired baby dolphin to tackle.

It took about 10-15 minutes for the pair to get the dolphin into deep enough water for it to gain supported swimming momentum.

Sanders stands on the shore cheering the dolphin on. “Come on buddy, you can do it,” he cheers. “It’s a struggle. I see him trying, he really wants to make it out there, he’s just really disoriented no doubt.”

Sanders came across several other dolphins along the beach, including an adult needing a group of local Florida residents to assist in its rescue:

Today pointed out Sanders’ lengthy career in hurricane reporting (he’s covered over 60) and the fact that he’s been part of dolphin rescue stories before, so serendipitously, he knew how to perform a rescue.

Precisely where Sanders was standing hours earlier, a group of Florida residents rescued yet another dolphin, picked up by Fox 4:

Looks like Sanders has started something.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Star of anti-dolphin killing film The Cove held by Japanese immigration

Ric OBarry seen in documentary about slaughter in a Japanese village says government is waging a war on dolphins

The star of Oscar-winning documentary The Cove, about the killing of dolphins in a village in Japan, has been detained by immigration authorities at Tokyos Narita international airport.

Ric OBarry an American known for training the dolphins used in the TV series Flipper said immigration officials told him he could not enter Japan on a tourist visa because he was not a tourist, according to his lawyer, Takashi Takano.

Takano said officials accused OBarry of having close ties with the anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd, which OBarry denies. Immigration officials said it was their policy not to comment on individual cases.

Takano said he was appealing against the detention, and that the Japanese government would decide on whether to allow OBarry into the country or deport him. It was not clear when a decision would be made.

The Cove, which won the 2009 Academy Award for best documentary, shows the slaughter of dolphins herded into a cove in the fishing village of Taiji and bludgeoned to death.

The Japanese government is cracking down on those who oppose their war on dolphins, OBarry said in a statement sent to the Associated Press through his son, Lincoln OBarry.

Officials in Taiji, a small fishing village in central Japan, and fishermen have defended the hunt as a tradition, saying that eating dolphin meat is no different to eating beef or chicken.

Most Japanese have never eaten dolphin meat. Many say they are horrified by the dolphin killing and there is a campaign against the Taiji hunt. Animal welfare activists say the hunt is driven mostly by the lucrative sale of dolphins to aquariums, with the income from the sale of meat simply an added extra.

OBarry has been stopped and questioned by Japanese immigration before. He has also been taken into custody by local police on the suspicion of not having proper travel documents before being released. But this is the first time he has been detained in this way. He has the support of high-profile celebrities, including Sting, the US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, and the former Guns N Roses drummer, Matt Sorum.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Tourists Were Taking Selfies With A Baby Dolphin…And It Died As A Result

In Argentina, people lined up for what seemed like a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity with a baby dolphin, but their actions possibly ended the creature’s life.

After a person spotted a baby Franciscana dolphin close to the shore at a local beach, they took it out of the water so that people could take selfies with the animal. Allegedly, they kept it out of the water for too long, the dolphin overheated and died.

What’s worse is that this particular species is endangered.

People couldn’t resist the temptation of taking pictures, and their actions ultimately doomed the poor creature.

Baby dolphin dies after tourists ‘pull it out of ocean for selfies’

Posted by The Independent on Thursday, February 18, 2016

Various wildlife organizations have responded to the tragic incident.

It’s possible that the baby dolphin perished before the crowd got their hands on it (which is why it was so close to the shore or possibly washed ashore). Whether or not it was already dead, there is a lesson to be learned here: love our planet and give nature the distance and respect it deserves.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

Dolphin Steals Womans iPad; Is Sick of Your Selfies

A dolphin at Seaworld Orlando was filmed stealing an iPad right out a woman’s hand. “That’s what you get for keeping me in captivity,” the iPad stealing dolphin said in an interview with the Sifter.

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

Taiji legal battle: court backs activist over baby dolphin kept in aquarium

Victory for animal rights after Japanese court awards Australian activist 110,000 yen after museum refused her entry to check on captive bottlenose

Animal rights activists have claimed a significant victory in its battle to end Japans dolphin slaughter after a court ruled that an aquarium in Taiji where hundreds of dolphins are killed every year acted illegally when it refused entry to an Australian campaigner.

The court in Wakayama, western Japan, on Friday awarded 110,000 yen (690) to Sarah Lucas, head of Australia for Dolphins, who had attempted to enter the Taiji whale museum in 2014 but was turned away and shown a cardboard sign saying anti-whalers were not welcome.

Lucas had intended to check on the welfare of a baby albino bottlenose that had been kept at the museum since being separated from its pod and captured earlier in the year. The museum reportedly paid $500,0000 (354,000) for the animal.

Lucas said the rare dolphin, called Angel, was being kept in a tiny crowded tank full of chlorine, and was being bullied by other dolphins.

The legal battle to save Angel is much bigger than a rescue mission to save one albino dolphin calf, Lucas said after the verdict.

This win proves the Taiji whale museum, the institution at the heart of the dolphin hunting trade, behaved illegally. It also shows the Taiji dolphin hunts are not above the law, which means the Japanese legal system can be used to end the cruel dolphin hunts for good.

Tetsuo Kirihata, deputy chief of the Taiji museum, said he was satisfied with the verdict because the initial demand for damages had been for about 3m yen.

We feel much of our case was taken into account by the court, he told Associated Press. Kirihata said the dolphin was eating well and getting along with other dolphins, with regular blood tests showing it was healthy. What to some might look like bullying was, in fact, part of regular activity in nature, he added.

The museum is owned by the town government in Taiji, the setting for the Oscar-winning 2009 documentary The Cove, which showed fishermen driving pods of dolphins into shallow water before killing them with knives.

Photo
Photo taken in 2014 by environmentalist group Sea Shepherd Conservation Society shows bottlenose dolphins trapped in the cove during the selection process by fishermen in the Japanese town of Taiji. Photograph: Sea Shepherd Conservation Societ/AFP/Getty Images

The use of the drive method has attracted widespread criticism, including from the US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy.

International pressure on Taiji to distance itself from the global trade in dolphins intensified last year when aquariums in Japan voted to stop buying live specimens from the town to avoid expulsion from the worlds leading zoo organisation.

The move came after the Guardian revealed that the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (Waza) had been targeted in a court action launched by Australia for Dolphins. The group accused Waza of being complicit in the hunts by failing to take decisive action against Japanese aquariums.

The museum in Taiji, however, quit the Japanese branch of the world association in protest, with local fishermen vowing to continue the hunts.

During the most recent season, which ended last month, Taijis fishermen killed 652 dolphins and took 111 into captivity, according to figures supplied by the Sea Shepherd marine conservation group.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Please quit surfing with dolphins and whales while we’re stuck in the office

Here’s a request: Please stop posting videos of incredible encounters with wildlife in stunning locations while we’re working 9 to 5. It’s just cruel.

Take Luke Taylor, who caught vision of these dolphins hanging out at Tallow Beach, near Byron Bay, Australia on Feb. 17. The creatures can be seen swimming and jumping alongside the surfers.

“It was so magical to see them so calm & joyful in their own habitat with all the surfers around them,” Taylor wrote in the video’s description. Dare to dream.

Over in Kaikoura, New Zealand, a group of jet skiers recently found themselves surrounded by a family of orcas while out on the water.

The orcas can be seen travelling alongside each other in a Facebook video by Boardsilly surf and sup adventures, as thrilled onlookers watch on.

Surf instructor Dave Lyons told the Kaikoura Star he’d never seen that many Orca before. He estimated there were about 30 spread over an area of 3 kilometres (1.8 miles).

“There was the mum one side, and the dad on the other. We never got close to him but he was huge his fin was enormous,” he told the newspaper. “All the pups were playing, it was just so amazing.”

New Zealand is home to only an estimated 150 to 200 individual orcas, according to the Department of Conservation, which makes this a rare sight. However, the department notes a vessel should not be closer than 50 metres (54 yards) to an orca.

So sure, go see some whales instead of wailing (silently) in your office. Just remember to be respectful, folks.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Rare dolphin dies after beachgoers pass it around for selfies

At least one of two rare La Plata dolphins died after beachgoers in Argentina took them ashore to snap some selfies.

The dolphin died from dehydration after people passed it around so they could take pictures with it.

La Plata dolphins are considered vulnerable,and their population is in decline, although exact numbers remain unclear. Although they are one of the worlds smallest species of dolphins, they can live to be 20 years old and are highly intelligent.

It should go without saying that animals should not be removed from their homesespecially in the waterfor the sake of a cute picture or a closer look. Doing so can not only kill the animal but also, if it is rare enough, threaten its entire species.

Even approaching animals in their natural environment can cause them stress. Over time, if enough people unintentionally traumatize an animal, such encounters can lead to death by a thousand cuts.

Researchers who study wild marine animals carefully monitor the stress levels of animals they capture and release. Even those encounters can cause some stress.

If people in boats repeatedly approach an animal, it must expend considerable energy simply trying to escape, thus burning more calories than it normally would and requiring more food than normal. Higher-than-average food intake can be a problem because a roaming mammal in the open ocean is not guaranteed a large food supply. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationrecommendsthat people keep their distance and that they don’t pursue animals they encounter in the water or on the beach.

The agency also warns people not to feed, touch, or attract any animals. Everyone should be familiar with the basics of any wildlife they might encounter on a trip. Simply Googling the location one is planning to visit often yields basic safety information that can save the life of the travelerand that of the possibly endangered animal.

Photo by Hernan Coria/Facebook

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

Dolphin leaps out of water and lands on top junior surf champion

It’s not all fun and games in the water.

Junior surfing champion Jed Gradisen got a huge surprise while surfing off the west coast of Australia when a dolphin jumped out of the water and landed directly on his board.

Thankfully, Jed’s father was there to capture the startling moment on camera.

“I think it was just an accident that the dolphin jumped on me,” Jed said to local news station KABC. “It was just as amazed as I was.”

Luckily, Jed was not seriously hurt and insisted the experience wouldn’t keep him out of the water.

Surf on, Jed. We’ll be on the beach.

BONUS:

Summer’s almost over! Can you find the hot dogs among the Instagrams of people’s legs? art by @ambardelmoral

A photo posted by Mashable Watercooler (@watercooler) on

Source: http://mashable.com/

Dolphins hydroplaning at super speed will make you want to be a dolphin

Just when you thought dolphins couldn’t get any smarter or cooler, they show up every other animal in the kingdom and hydroplane like the speed demons they are.

In this video uploaded to Youtube by BBC Earth, dolphins in Western Australia hunt for fish by zooming along the shoreline in the most majestic, speedy fashion.

According to the video, dolphins usually stun their prey by slapping it with their tails. But for these dolphins, the fish are just a bit out of reach. So to capture their dinner, they wind up by vigorously pumping their tails to gain speed, and then hydroplane at super speed to grab the fish.

No, the video isn’t sped up – those guys are really going that fast.

There’s little room for error because if this strategy goes south for the dolphins, they could end up stranded on the shore.

But life in the ocean works as it does on land – “fortune favors the brave.”

Source: http://mashable.com/

Surfer is super pumped to be body slammed by a dolphin

Seems like all you can do is laugh when you get whacked by a dolphin.

Surfer Sam Yoon was ecstatic when he was knocked off his board by the aquatic mammal off Duranbah Beach, in Australia’s Tweed Heads. The dolphin was leaping in front of a wave and collided with Yoon as it dived back into the water.

“You see that? It landed on my head, shoulders and the back. It was like, full on,” Yoon told 9 News Thursday, while reacting to iPhone footage of the collision.

Image: 9 NEws

The animal can be seen trying to avoid Yoon, tilting to its right mid-air. Yoon tried to get out of the way too, but it was too late.

“I knew that he realised he’s gotta do something too. I was like, f*ck this, no way I can get away from this,” he laughed.

Yoon was not injured, and kept surfing after the collision occurred. He thinks the dolphins might’ve communicated with each other after the incident, avoiding him every time he was paddling.

That’s one cool surfing story to tell the mates, we admit.

Source: http://mashable.com/

Rare Pink Dolphin Spotted in Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Redit user sloshyjacob recently shared a series of amazing photos his friend took of ‘Pinkie’ a rare pink dolphin known to frequent the waters of Lake Calcasieu, Louisiana.

For those wondering how a dolphin can possibly find its way and survive in a fresh water lake, Calcasieu connects to the Gulf of Mexico and actually consists of brackish or briny water which has more salinity than fresh water but not as much as seawater.

“Pinkie” is an albino bottlenose dolphin that was first spotted on June 24, 2007 by charter boat captain Erik Rue.

More recent sightings from 2015 captured “Pinkie” mating, confirming that the dolphin was female.
 
[via sloshyjacob on reddit]

Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit
Photograph via sloshyjacob on reddit

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

Stunning Footage Captures The Incredible Moment A Dolphin Gives Birth To Her Calf

Katrl, a Pacific white-sided dolphin living at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium, recently gave birth to a calf. A sight that has never been observed in the wild for this particular species of dolphins, much less ever having been filmed!

After three hours of intense labor, the mixture of nervous and excited chatter from onlookers gave way to gasps and applause as the newborn dolphin calf wriggled with the kick, kick, kick of its tiny tail to the tank’s surface and took its very first breath of air.

Witness the miracle of life unfold in the video below, and don’t worry, it’s not too graphic!

The as-yet-unnamed calf is the first for 29-year-old mother Katrl and it increases the relatively small population of the Pacific white-sided dolphins in North American zoos and aquariums to 16.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

Whales and dolphins lead ‘human-like lives’ thanks to big brains, says study

The cultural brain hypothesis of human development could also explain cetaceans forming friendships and even gossiping

Life is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenose dolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Many cetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play.

That much scientists know. But in a new study, researchers compiled a list of the rich behaviours spotted in 90 different species of dolphins, whales and porpoises, and found that the bigger the species brain, the more complex indeed, the more human-like their lives are likely to be.

This suggests that the cultural brain hypothesis the theory that suggests our intelligence developed as a way of coping with large and complex social groups may apply to whales and dolphins, as well as humans.

Writing in the journal, Nature Ecology and Evolution, the researchers claim that complex social and cultural characteristics, such as hunting together, developing regional dialects and learning from observation, are linked to the expansion of the animals brains a process known as encephalisation.

The researchers gathered records of dolphins playing with humpback whales, helping fishermen with their catches, and even producing signature whistles for dolphins that are absent suggesting the animals may even gossip.

Another common behaviour was adult animals raising unrelated young. There is the saying that it takes a village to raise a child [and that] seems to be true for both whales and humans, said Michael Muthukrishna, an economic psychologist and co-author on the study at the London School of Economics.

Dolphins
Dolphins off the coast of South Africa. Photograph: Rainer Schimpf/Barcroft Media

Like humans, the cetaceans, a group made up of dolphins, whales and porpoises, are thought to do most of their learning socially rather than individually, which could explain why some species learn more complex behaviours than others. Those predominantly found alone or in small groups had the smallest brains, the researchers led by Susanne Shultz at the University of Manchester wrote.

Luke Rendell, a biologist at the University of St Andrews who was not involved in the study, but has done work on sperm whales and their distinctive dialects, warned against anthropomorphising and making animals appear to be like humans.

There is a risk of sounding like there is a single train line, with humans at the final station and other animals on their way of getting there. The truth is that every animal responds to their own evolutionary pressures, he said.

There is definitely a danger in comparing other animals to humans, especially with the data available. But what we can say for sure, is that this cultural-brain hypothesis we tested is present in primates and in cetaceans, Muthukrishna said.

There was still much more to learn, though, he added. Studies with underwater mammals are difficult and vastly underfunded, so there is so much we dont know about these fascinating animals, he said.

The fascination, however, should not only be interesting for people studying animals. We dont have to look at other planets to look for aliens, because we know that underwater there are these amazing species with so many parallels to us in their complex behaviours, said Muthukrishna.

Studying evolutionarily distinct animals such as cetaceans could act as a control group for studying intelligence in general, and so help the understanding of our own intellect.

It is interesting to think that whale and human brains are different in their structure but have brought us to the same patterns in behaviour, Rendell said. The extent of how this is close to humans can educate us about evolutionary forces in general.

However, Muthukrishna points out that intelligence is always driven by the environment an animal finds itself in. Each environment presents a different set of challenges for an animal. When you are above water, you learn how to tackle fire, for example, he said. As smart as whales are, they will never learn to light a spark.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Selfie-Crazed Beachgoers Kill Rare Dolphin

A mob of beachgoers desperate to take photos with two small dolphins killed at least one of the animals on a beach in Buenos Aires last week.

“This is more than upsetting,” Lori Marino, executive director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy, told The Huffington Post in an email. “It is an indictment of how our species treats other animals — as objects for our benefit, as props, as things with value only in relation to us. This is a terribly painful story but it goes on, writ large, every day all over the world.”

Marino identified the dolphin seen being passed around in now-infamous images as an infant. Disturbing footage reportedly from the same incident shows someone pulling a dolphin out of the water and placing it on land as people crowd around.

The Foundation Vida Silvestre, a group that represents the World Wildlife Fund in Argentina, said in a statement that two dolphins were pulled from the water, and confirmed that at least one of the animals died. It identified the creatures as Franciscana dolphins — also known as La Plata dolphins.

Hernan Coria, who posted images of the situation to his Facebook account, called the incident a “shame” and said he did not believe the dolphins were alive. Despite his clear disapproval, Coria is receiving an onslaught of online hate over the photos — probably from people who did not read his caption.

Since dolphins are mammals — and therefore breathe air — some people may be under the mistaken impression that they can survive when held out of the water. This is not the case.

As Vida Silvestre noted, dolphins cannot remain out of the water long because their skin dehydrates and they overheat.

“They aren’t able to regulate their temperature when they come out of the water,” Marino told HuffPost, explaining that underwater, the animals lose much more heat than they do when out of the water. In fact, dolphins don’t even have to be totally out of the water to suffer from overheating.

“We also see this in theme parks when there’s no shade,” she said. “If they’re not spending enough time under the water, then you see [overheating].”

Additionally, the bodies of dolphins, porpoises and whales aren’t designed to support themselves outside of the buoyancy of the water. Being out of the water — whether stranded on land or being held up by human beings– can cause the animals’ rib cage to collapse, causing serious organ damage. And the stress alone from being yanked from the water and manhandled can cause cardiac arrest — as is seen when dolphins are captured from the wild.

If beachgoers find a dolphin that seems stranded, the best course of action is to alert the proper authorities, while keeping the animal floated in the water and its skin wet. Keep any touching to a minimum, in order to avoid the risk of spreading human diseases to the creature, Marino said.

Ultimately, Marino believes that a worldview that treats animals as mere entertainment — and not living beings that demand respect — is what led to the dolphin’s death.

“We use them to adorn our lives, and we, literally, throw them away like garbage when we’re finished using them,” she said.

Irina Ivanova contributed translation. 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

‘Not ashamed’: dolphin hunters of Taiji break silence over film The Cove

Members of the tiny Japanese community, which was vilified in the 2009 documentary, speak to the Guardian about fishing and their unique way of life

Taiji is still in darkness when a dozen men gather at the quayside and warm themselves over a brazier. While the rest of the town sleeps, they sip from cans of hot coffee, smoke cigarettes and talk in hushed tones.

As soon as the sun edges above the peninsula, they take to their boats, steering out to sea in formation in search of their prey: the dolphin.

It has been eight years since the Oscar-winning film The Cove propelled this community in an isolated corner of Japans Pacific coast to the centre of a bitter debate over the pursuit of dolphins for human consumption and entertainment.

The films graphic footage of dolphins being slaughtered with knives, turning the surrounding sea a crimson red, shocked audiences around the world.

Unaccustomed to international attention and wrong-footed by their social media-savvy opponents, the towns 3,200 residents simply went to ground. Requests for interviews with town officials went unanswered; the fishermen took a vow of silence.

But after years of keeping their counsel, Taijis fishermen have finally spoken out, agreeing to talk to the Guardian about their work, their whaling heritage, and their determination to continue hunting dolphins.

Weve mostly stayed silent since The Cove, and thats why our point of view was never put across in the media, says Yoshifumi Kai, a senior official with Taijis fisheries cooperative.

Taijis
Taijis dolphin hunters head out to sea Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

Kai attributes that reticence down to what he claims are attempts by activists from Sea Shepherd and other conservation groups to manufacture confrontations, which they film and post online, and challenges claims that the practice of slaughtering dolphins beneath tarpaulin sheets is proof that he and his fellow fishermen have something to hide.

Activists say we are concealing something because we know that what we are doing is immoral, but thats nonsense, he says. You never see cattle or other animals being slaughtered in public. Its not something you do out in the open.

The earliest recorded coastal whale hunts in Taiji can be traced back to the early 1600s. Scrolls on display in the towns whale museum depict dozens of boats decorated with symbols taken from Buddhism and Japans indigenous religion, Shinto, in pursuit of a whale big enough to sustain the entire community for months.

Foreign activists ask us why we kill these cute animals, but we see them as a vital source of food, even now, says Taijis mayor, Kazutaka Sangen. When I was a boy, a third of the town would turn out to greet a whale being brought back to shore, because they were desperate to eat its meat. We are grateful to the whales we want Westerners to understand that.

Taiji Japan map

By killing dolphins and other small whales, fishermen are continuing a tradition that enabled their ancestors to survive before the days of mass transport and the availability of other sources of nutrition, adds Sangen.

We couldnt grow rice or vegetables here, and we had no natural water supply. We needed to kill whales to eat, and hundreds of people died doing so. This was a very difficult place to survive, and we will always be grateful to our ancestors for their sacrifice. Its because of them that we are all here today.

For Sangen, everything in Taiji from services for elderly residents to education and tourist infrastructure depends on the income it makes from the sale of dolphins to zoos and aquariums. Several times during the interview he refers to kujira no megumi literally, the blessing of the whale. Whaling enables this town to function, he says.

Using remote-controlled helicopters and hidden underwater cameras, The Cove provided graphic footage of Taijis infamous drive hunts, whose critics include the former US ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy.

Typically, fishermen pursue pods of dolphins across open seas, banging metal poles against their boats to confuse their hypersensitive sonar, before herding them into a narrow inlet. There, they are either slaughtered for their meat or selected and sold for large sums to aquariums and marine parks.

While dolphin meat for human consumption generates only modest profits, Taijis fishermen can reportedly sell a live specimen to brokers for about 8,000 US dollars. A fully trained dolphin can then fetch more than 40,000 US dollars if sold overseas, and about half that in Japan.

Minke
Minke whale sashimi served at a restaurant in Taiji Photograph: Justin McCurry

The 20 or so Taiji fishermen who take to the sea between September and April to hunt bottlenose dolphins, pilot whales and other small cetaceans have been emboldened by the release of Okujirasama (A Whale of a Tale) a documentary by the New York-based filmmaker Megumi Sasaki that counters what she describes as The Coves one-sided treatment of a complex issue.

While making her film, Sasaki concluded that the debate over Taiji is an irreconcilable clash of cultures between the global, and Western-led, animal rights movement and local traditions steeped in religion and ancestor worship.

Whaling is the glue that holds this town together

If dolphins are so important to the local community, then why kill them thats what many Westerners cant understand, Sasaki says. But we think of animals as a resource, not that they are special creatures that can do things humans cant do. Its a totally different way of thinking. Whaling is the glue that holds this town together its inseparable from local identity and pride.

Kai dismisses claims that that he and other fishermen employ a singularly cruel method to kill the dolphins. The way we work has changed with the times, he says. In response to criticism, fishermen now dispatch the animals by inserting a knife into their neck, severing their brain stem a method he claims is the most humane possible, but which some experts have said does not result in a painless or immediate death.

On a recent morning, the seafront in Taiji is free from confrontation, although activists have tweeted their regular early-morning photos of the banger boats heading out to sea.

The fishermen appear to have reached an uneasy truce with overseas campaigners, first from Sea Shepherd, and now from the Dolphin Project, a group formed by the dolphin trainer-turned activist Ric OBarry.

Warning
Warning signs near the cove in Taiji. Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

But there is still little interaction between the two sides. They dont want to listen, only to provoke us, Mitsunori Kobata, president of Taijis dolphin-hunting association, says over a dinner of minke whale sashimi and steamed rice flavoured with thin strips of whale blubber.

Theyre here to do whatever they can to obstruct our business, so we dont see any point in engaging with them. Theyre never going to change their minds, whatever we say.

Pointing to slices of sauted meat, from the belly of a short-finned pilot whale, that he has brought from home, Kobata adds: In the days when there was no refrigeration, people preserved meat like this in salt. Of course, there are lots of other sources of protein around these days, but people of my generation and older still have the right to eat whale if we want to.

Both men hope Sasakis documentary will restore some equilibrium to a debate that has cast a shadow over Taiji for almost a decade.

They point out that they kill just under 2,000 small cetaceans a year, a tenth of Japans annual quota, adding that none of the species is endangered or covered by the 1986 global moratorium on commercial whaling.

Were not ashamed of hunting dolphins and would never consider stopping, Kai says. Its the most important part of our local tradition.

Just look around you if we didnt make a living from the sea, there would be nothing left. People keep telling us to stop whaling and find another way of earning a living. But what on earth would we do instead?

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

This beached baby dolphin was rescued by an NBC reporter

Reporters tend to keep their distance from the story, but when a baby dolphin needed help, one reporter rose to the occasion.

NBC News reporter Kerry Sanders helped rescue a stranded baby dolphin on Marco Island, Florida during a storm surge caused by Hurricane Irma. Sanders’ rescue attempt was broadcast live on Today.

Today reports that the dolphin had been brought back to the beach by a local after being found washed all the way to a sidewalk.

Sanders reports the surges as measuring 4 feet, enough to wash wildlife ashore. After finding the exhausted dolphin on the beach, Sanders teamed up with a passing tourist to help it back into the Gulf of Mexico.

The baby dolphin, who proved pretty heavy for two grown men to deliver back to the ocean, was nursed and carried into the oncoming waves — not an easy hurdle for a tired baby dolphin to tackle.

It took about 10-15 minutes for the pair to get the dolphin into deep enough water for it to gain supported swimming momentum.

Sanders stands on the shore cheering the dolphin on. “Come on buddy, you can do it,” he cheers. “It’s a struggle. I see him trying, he really wants to make it out there, he’s just really disoriented no doubt.”

Sanders came across several other dolphins along the beach, including an adult needing a group of local Florida residents to assist in its rescue:

Today pointed out Sanders’ lengthy career in hurricane reporting (he’s covered over 60) and the fact that he’s been part of dolphin rescue stories before, so serendipitously, he knew how to perform a rescue.

Precisely where Sanders was standing hours earlier, a group of Florida residents rescued yet another dolphin, picked up by Fox 4:

Looks like Sanders has started something.

Source: http://mashable.com/