Guy decides to use his drone for one important job: flying a big stuffed bear around

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It’s bird, it’s a plane, it’s a big flying… bear?

Hunter Clearly (@Cyranek_ ) found the best way to use his new DJI Mavic Pro drone by flying a plush bear (known as the Tiny Headed Kingdom Bear, but to Clearly, simply Bart) across the sky. 

Just imagine the horror and confusion on neighbors’ faces. The perfect writing inspiration for the next season of Black Mirror

“I got curious as to how much weight the drone could carry. Googled and found out it could lift two pounds,” said the 19 year old to Mashable. “Me and my roommates were looking around for something to lift, saw the bear. We weighed the bear and found out it was a perfect two pounds.”

And up the bear went. 

Of course, that small-headed bear elicited some pretty choice reactions from a bewildered internet.

The tweet already has over 2,000 retweets and 6,000 likes. Although the bear didn’t stay in the air for too long, it was still a great experiment for Clearly. 

“My job is to make content for the internet so I was hoping it would get shared around,” said Clearly. “I’ve never seen any of my posts blow up this fast though. Definitely made my day waking up in the morning to 1000+ notifications.”

He’s still interested in trying other weird objects and scaring the hell out his neighborhood. 

Source: http://mashable.com/

Rare drone footage enlightens scientists on feeding behavior of blue whales

One small flight for drones has the potential to be one giant step for science … just ask researchers at Oregon State University.

A group of scientists at the university recently captured rare footage of blue whales feeding in the Southern Ocean off New Zealand via drone.

The stunning footage, narrated by Leigh G. Torres, expedition leader and principal investigator with the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State, provides a great deal of insight into what whales eat and how they decide what food is worthy of their time.

In a press release, Torres explained the footage clearly shows the blue whales’ “lunge-feeding” process of suddenly lunging forward to eat a massive pack of krill.

“Our footage shows this [lunge-feeding theory] in action,” said Torres. “We can see the whale making choices, which is really extraordinary because aerial observations of blue whales feeding on krill are rare. The whale bypasses certain krill patches presumably because the nutritional payoff isnt sufficient and targets other krill patches that are more lucrative.”

“We think this is because blue whales are so big, and stopping to lunge-feed and then speeding up again is so energy-intensive, that they try to maximize their effort,” Torres continued.

As for the unique perspective, the investigator gave a big thumbs up to drone usage, explaining they’re a “great way to film [the whales’] behavior without disturbing their behavior at all, unlike other aerial methods like a helicopter or a plane, which cant hover or make a lot of noise.”

Source: http://mashable.com/

Rare drone footage enlightens scientists on feeding behavior of blue whales

One small flight for drones has the potential to be one giant step for science … just ask researchers at Oregon State University.

A group of scientists at the university recently captured rare footage of blue whales feeding in the Southern Ocean off New Zealand via drone.

The stunning footage, narrated by Leigh G. Torres, expedition leader and principal investigator with the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State, provides a great deal of insight into what whales eat and how they decide what food is worthy of their time.

In a press release, Torres explained the footage clearly shows the blue whales’ “lunge-feeding” process of suddenly lunging forward to eat a massive pack of krill.

“Our footage shows this [lunge-feeding theory] in action,” said Torres. “We can see the whale making choices, which is really extraordinary because aerial observations of blue whales feeding on krill are rare. The whale bypasses certain krill patches presumably because the nutritional payoff isnt sufficient and targets other krill patches that are more lucrative.”

“We think this is because blue whales are so big, and stopping to lunge-feed and then speeding up again is so energy-intensive, that they try to maximize their effort,” Torres continued.

As for the unique perspective, the investigator gave a big thumbs up to drone usage, explaining they’re a “great way to film [the whales’] behavior without disturbing their behavior at all, unlike other aerial methods like a helicopter or a plane, which cant hover or make a lot of noise.”

Source: http://mashable.com/

This drone is designed to chase birds away from your house

Tech touches everything these days, even the most primitive of instruments. If you have a bird problem, forget the old fashioned scarecrowyou can get its modern successor, a bird-repelling drone.

The ProHawk UAV from pest control company Bird-X is a massive update to the old school method of shooing birds from places where they aren’t wanted. With a carbon fiber frame designed to resemble a bird of prey with wings extended, the ProHawk has a look that should keep smaller birds from congregating.

It does more than just look intimidating; the ProHawk is equipped with a sonic bird repeller. According to Bird-X President Dennis Tilles, the speaker “emits predator calls as well as birds in distress.” Those noises are enough to sends birds flying elsewhere.

While it can be controlled manually, one of the appeals of the unmanned craft is the ability to set an autonomous flight pattern. GPS enables the ProHawk to patrol an area on its own, traveling from waypoint to waypoint, and the self-flying mode launches and lands the plane without need for assistance.

Tilles told the Daily Dot that, in accordance with FAA suggestions, the ProHawk be used only for a one-mile radius. For private land, he said a 10 square mile area can be covered by the drone, which moves at up to 30 miles per hour.

It’s worth noting that the drone can remain airborne for just 15 to 20 minutes before it requires an additional charge. That might be enough to scare off a murder of crows immediately, but if you want to keep the area clear of birds on a regular basis, you’ll have to keep an eye on the battery life. A wireless charging station would likely simplify the upkeep portion of maintenance for the autonomous drone.

The system, Tilles said, is ideal for, “keeping birds away from certain areas such as vineyards or other delectable crops, golf courses, airfield fisheries, and other industries trying to save assets or prevent mess and disease from bird droppings.”

The ProHawk doesn’t come cheapTilles said the device is priced at around $5,000. There are also options to add a camera to the device for those who want to see what the drone sees while it’s flying on its own.

If you’re in the market for such a device, though, Bird-X has some history to back its drone. The company has been making similar products for some time now. The ProHawk is the spiritual successor to the company’s BirdXPeller. A remote-controlled aircraft launched in 2011, the BirdXPeller blasted noise that would make birds scatter.

H/T Gizmag | Photo via Bird-X

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

Science drones accidentally record hot turtle porn

Drones have done many epic things that humans can only dream of doing. They’ve made pizza delivery savvy as hell, they’resaving the rainforest, and they’ve even taken chainsaws to the next level.

They’re also hands-down the best devices to use for some sweet scientific voyeurism.

A research team descended on the Gulf of Mexico recently to study the endangered Kemps ridley sea turtles. Not wanting to disturb the skittish sea beasts, the scientists deployed drones to capture their footage.

Needless to say, they got a bit sidetracked by all the green turtle copulation their drones captured instead.

Its not that often you get to talk about turtle porn, Elizabeth Bevan toldHakai Magazine.

Bevan, a doctoral student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and her research partner were the first to watch the turtles gettin’ busy.

The two researchers inadvertently set the scene by placing a black sheet over themselves to get a better look at their drone footage. That privacy screen was just enough to put the green turtles at ease.

Scientists have discovered that turtle courtship is pretty much just like hooking up at a honky tonk: turtles dance around each other poorly, get a bit feisty, and then awkwardly kiss. In the turtles’ case, they rub throats. Depending on how much you’ve had to drink, you might also do the same thing while trying to score.

Scientists caught the turtles getting nasty a total of seven times. Special shoutouts to the two male turtles who were just looking to experiment and also tried to bang.

Researchers hope to buy an even better drone to further get in on the turtle sex action. They’re still trying to get a glimpse of Kemps ridley sea turtles in coitus, too.

The drone-assisted work of these scientists may open up a whole new genre of specialty porn scientific discovery. The future truly is grand.

H/T Hakai Magazine

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

Rare drone footage enlightens scientists on feeding behavior of blue whales

One small flight for drones has the potential to be one giant step for science … just ask researchers at Oregon State University.

A group of scientists at the university recently captured rare footage of blue whales feeding in the Southern Ocean off New Zealand via drone.

The stunning footage, narrated by Leigh G. Torres, expedition leader and principal investigator with the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State, provides a great deal of insight into what whales eat and how they decide what food is worthy of their time.

In a press release, Torres explained the footage clearly shows the blue whales’ “lunge-feeding” process of suddenly lunging forward to eat a massive pack of krill.

“Our footage shows this [lunge-feeding theory] in action,” said Torres. “We can see the whale making choices, which is really extraordinary because aerial observations of blue whales feeding on krill are rare. The whale bypasses certain krill patches presumably because the nutritional payoff isnt sufficient and targets other krill patches that are more lucrative.”

“We think this is because blue whales are so big, and stopping to lunge-feed and then speeding up again is so energy-intensive, that they try to maximize their effort,” Torres continued.

As for the unique perspective, the investigator gave a big thumbs up to drone usage, explaining they’re a “great way to film [the whales’] behavior without disturbing their behavior at all, unlike other aerial methods like a helicopter or a plane, which cant hover or make a lot of noise.”

Source: http://mashable.com/

Science drones accidentally record hot turtle porn

Drones have done many epic things that humans can only dream of doing. They’ve made pizza delivery savvy as hell, they’resaving the rainforest, and they’ve even taken chainsaws to the next level.

They’re also hands-down the best devices to use for some sweet scientific voyeurism.

A research team descended on the Gulf of Mexico recently to study the endangered Kemps ridley sea turtles. Not wanting to disturb the skittish sea beasts, the scientists deployed drones to capture their footage.

Needless to say, they got a bit sidetracked by all the green turtle copulation their drones captured instead.

Its not that often you get to talk about turtle porn, Elizabeth Bevan toldHakai Magazine.

Bevan, a doctoral student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and her research partner were the first to watch the turtles gettin’ busy.

The two researchers inadvertently set the scene by placing a black sheet over themselves to get a better look at their drone footage. That privacy screen was just enough to put the green turtles at ease.

Scientists have discovered that turtle courtship is pretty much just like hooking up at a honky tonk: turtles dance around each other poorly, get a bit feisty, and then awkwardly kiss. In the turtles’ case, they rub throats. Depending on how much you’ve had to drink, you might also do the same thing while trying to score.

Scientists caught the turtles getting nasty a total of seven times. Special shoutouts to the two male turtles who were just looking to experiment and also tried to bang.

Researchers hope to buy an even better drone to further get in on the turtle sex action. They’re still trying to get a glimpse of Kemps ridley sea turtles in coitus, too.

The drone-assisted work of these scientists may open up a whole new genre of specialty porn scientific discovery. The future truly is grand.

H/T Hakai Magazine

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

This drone is designed to chase birds away from your house

Tech touches everything these days, even the most primitive of instruments. If you have a bird problem, forget the old fashioned scarecrowyou can get its modern successor, a bird-repelling drone.

The ProHawk UAV from pest control company Bird-X is a massive update to the old school method of shooing birds from places where they aren’t wanted. With a carbon fiber frame designed to resemble a bird of prey with wings extended, the ProHawk has a look that should keep smaller birds from congregating.

It does more than just look intimidating; the ProHawk is equipped with a sonic bird repeller. According to Bird-X President Dennis Tilles, the speaker “emits predator calls as well as birds in distress.” Those noises are enough to sends birds flying elsewhere.

While it can be controlled manually, one of the appeals of the unmanned craft is the ability to set an autonomous flight pattern. GPS enables the ProHawk to patrol an area on its own, traveling from waypoint to waypoint, and the self-flying mode launches and lands the plane without need for assistance.

Tilles told the Daily Dot that, in accordance with FAA suggestions, the ProHawk be used only for a one-mile radius. For private land, he said a 10 square mile area can be covered by the drone, which moves at up to 30 miles per hour.

It’s worth noting that the drone can remain airborne for just 15 to 20 minutes before it requires an additional charge. That might be enough to scare off a murder of crows immediately, but if you want to keep the area clear of birds on a regular basis, you’ll have to keep an eye on the battery life. A wireless charging station would likely simplify the upkeep portion of maintenance for the autonomous drone.

The system, Tilles said, is ideal for, “keeping birds away from certain areas such as vineyards or other delectable crops, golf courses, airfield fisheries, and other industries trying to save assets or prevent mess and disease from bird droppings.”

The ProHawk doesn’t come cheapTilles said the device is priced at around $5,000. There are also options to add a camera to the device for those who want to see what the drone sees while it’s flying on its own.

If you’re in the market for such a device, though, Bird-X has some history to back its drone. The company has been making similar products for some time now. The ProHawk is the spiritual successor to the company’s BirdXPeller. A remote-controlled aircraft launched in 2011, the BirdXPeller blasted noise that would make birds scatter.

H/T Gizmag | Photo via Bird-X

Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

This drone is designed to chase birds away from your house

Tech touches everything these days, even the most primitive of instruments. If you have a bird problem, forget the old fashioned scarecrowyou can get its modern successor, a bird-repelling drone.

The ProHawk UAV from pest control company Bird-X is a massive update to the old school method of shooing birds from places where they aren’t wanted. With a carbon fiber frame designed to resemble a bird of prey with wings extended, the ProHawk has a look that should keep smaller birds from congregating.

It does more than just look intimidating; the ProHawk is equipped with a sonic bird repeller. According to Bird-X President Dennis Tilles, the speaker “emits predator calls as well as birds in distress.” Those noises are enough to sends birds flying elsewhere.

While it can be controlled manually, one of the appeals of the unmanned craft is the ability to set an autonomous flight pattern. GPS enables the ProHawk to patrol an area on its own, traveling from waypoint to waypoint, and the self-flying mode launches and lands the plane without need for assistance.

Tilles told the Daily Dot that, in accordance with FAA suggestions, the ProHawk be used only for a one-mile radius. For private land, he said a 10 square mile area can be covered by the drone, which moves at up to 30 miles per hour.

It’s worth noting that the drone can remain airborne for just 15 to 20 minutes before it requires an additional charge. That might be enough to scare off a murder of crows immediately, but if you want to keep the area clear of birds on a regular basis, you’ll have to keep an eye on the battery life. A wireless charging station would likely simplify the upkeep portion of maintenance for the autonomous drone.

The system, Tilles said, is ideal for, “keeping birds away from certain areas such as vineyards or other delectable crops, golf courses, airfield fisheries, and other industries trying to save assets or prevent mess and disease from bird droppings.”

The ProHawk doesn’t come cheapTilles said the device is priced at around $5,000. There are also options to add a camera to the device for those who want to see what the drone sees while it’s flying on its own.

If you’re in the market for such a device, though, Bird-X has some history to back its drone. The company has been making similar products for some time now. The ProHawk is the spiritual successor to the company’s BirdXPeller. A remote-controlled aircraft launched in 2011, the BirdXPeller blasted noise that would make birds scatter.

H/T Gizmag | Photo via Bird-X

Read more: http://www.dailydot.com/technology/prohawk-uav-bird-chasing-drone/

A new code of conduct to protect animals from drones

Ecologist Jarrod Hodgson launches a fixed-wing UAV on Australias sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island
Image: Jarrod Hodgson

A quick search online will reveal dozens of videos of drone and bird encounters. While it’s always impressive to see a bird of prey take down a pesky quadcopter, the disturbance could impact the animal in ways we don’t yet understand.

As the commercial drone industry kicks off and drones are increasingly used in conservation efforts, two Australian researchers have developed an animal-drone code of conduct to begin the conversation about how these machines should be ethically used.

Clearly, we can’t be trusted to do the right thing as every drone versus gooseanddrone versus kangarooencounter proves.

Jarrod Hodgson, a researcher at the University of Adelaide’sUnmanned Research Aircraft Facility (URAF), andLian Pin Koh, director of URAF and founding director of ConservationDrones.org, who have both used drones for wildlife monitoring, believe more needs to be done to assess their impact.The code of conduct was published in the journal,Current Biology.

Some of the steps in the code include adopting a precautionary approach to flying near animals, thinking about the ethical treatment of animals during research and ceasing operations if the flight path is clearly disruptive.

In the case of ecological surveys, they suggest people should consider whether data could be collected via manned aircraft or satellite from altitudes that don’t affect the animals. The appropriate drone for the job could also be selected to minimise intrusion, even potentially altering the technology to “mimic non-threatening wildlife.”

Hodgsontold Mashable Australiathe code of conduct was just a first step. “Hopefully, we can develop species-specific protocols so researchers can use drones as a powerful and low-impact ecological research tool,” he said.

Southern elephant seals Mirounga leonina on Australias sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island viewed from above by a UAV.

Image: Jarrod Hodgson

Hodgson said we don’t really know the full impact drones have on animals.While some studies have looked at the effect of drones on animals from an observational point of view flying near wildlife and seeing how they respond few have measured important physiological elements such as heart rate and stress.

For birds, in particular, flying drones near their nest could have a dramatic impact. “If you did fly a drone really close to a nesting bird, it could take flight, and ultimately, it could cause it to abandon that nest,” Hodgson explained. “Potentially, right through to a large colony.”

A Sumatran elephant Elephas maximus sumatranus in North Sumatra viewed from above by a UAV.

Image: Lian Pin Koh

Hodgson hopes the code of conduct will also be adopted outside the world of academia, so all kinds of critters are spared the intrusion by irresponsible drone pilots.

While Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority hasn’t issued guidance on the topic, other institutions are putting policies in place to protect animals from drones.The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, for example, has issued advice to help protect marine life from drone disturbance.In the Australian state of New South Walesit is not permitted to fly a drone in a national park without a permit.The National Park Service in the U.S. has also tried to ban drones.

“It might be unintentional by hobbyists or commercial pilots, but that’s where increasing awareness will help people to understand what could result from their actions,” he said.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/05/23/animal-drone-code-conduct/

Science drones accidentally record hot turtle porn

Drones have done many epic things that humans can only dream of doing. They’ve made pizza delivery savvy as hell, they’resaving the rainforest, and they’ve even taken chainsaws to the next level.

They’re also hands-down the best devices to use for some sweet scientific voyeurism.

A research team descended on the Gulf of Mexico recently to study the endangered Kemps ridley sea turtles. Not wanting to disturb the skittish sea beasts, the scientists deployed drones to capture their footage.

Needless to say, they got a bit sidetracked by all the green turtle copulation their drones captured instead.

Its not that often you get to talk about turtle porn, Elizabeth Bevan toldHakai Magazine.

Bevan, a doctoral student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and her research partner were the first to watch the turtles gettin’ busy.

The two researchers inadvertently set the scene by placing a black sheet over themselves to get a better look at their drone footage. That privacy screen was just enough to put the green turtles at ease.

Scientists have discovered that turtle courtship is pretty much just like hooking up at a honky tonk: turtles dance around each other poorly, get a bit feisty, and then awkwardly kiss. In the turtles’ case, they rub throats. Depending on how much you’ve had to drink, you might also do the same thing while trying to score.

Scientists caught the turtles getting nasty a total of seven times. Special shoutouts to the two male turtles who were just looking to experiment and also tried to bang.

Researchers hope to buy an even better drone to further get in on the turtle sex action. They’re still trying to get a glimpse of Kemps ridley sea turtles in coitus, too.

The drone-assisted work of these scientists may open up a whole new genre of specialty porn scientific discovery. The future truly is grand.

H/T Hakai Magazine

Read more: http://www.dailydot.com/lol/turtles-sex-drones-scientists/