Making Your Own Delicious Gummy Bears At Home Is Easier Than You Think

What is it about gummy bears that makes them so irresistible for everyone from toddlers to teens…and full-grown adults?

Perhaps we’ll never know whether it’s their squishy consistency or their sugary flavor, but one thing we do know is that we can finally stop spending money on the store-bought versions. Yes, my friends, you can indeed make these childhood treats at home!

And the recipe is really easy!

Your kids are about to tout you as the best parents ever.

Source: http://www.viralnova.com

Cats help a Japanese chef take on American sushi

There’s something so satisfying about watching sushi being made.

JunsKitchen carefully crafts five American-inspired sushi rolls, which explores the difference between American and Japanese sushi. Jun says in the video’s comments that Japanese sushi focuses on “enjoying the pure flavor of ingredients that are in season,” while American sushi is based on the combination of flavors.

As Jun assembles the sushi, his two cats (Haku and Nagi, according to the description on his website) look on, giving their approval as he lets them sniff the ingredients. 

Sushi is good. Cat-approved sushi is even better. 

Source: http://mashable.com/

Just a load of animals enjoying pancakes because humans are weird

Humans aren’t content with tossing pancakes and eating them in a civilised fashion on Pancake Day. They must also put pancakes on their pets.

On Pancake Day, people are sharing photos of pancake #FoodPorn, but they’re also sharing photos that are guaranteed to brighten your day. People are sharing adorable and slightly weird photos of animals wearing and eating pancakes.

Here’s a kitten eating miniature, kitten-sized pancakes.

A post shared by Thomas (@thomastheragdoll_) on

Um, here’s a hedgehog eating a pancake. You’re welcome.

And, a cat checking out a blueberry-topped stack of pancakes.

Here’s a dog with a pancake that looks just like him.

A post shared by Banjo (@precious_banjo) on

Here’s another blueberry-loving pet.

A post shared by Poppy Johnson (@heypoppyj) on

Pugs love pancakes too.

Oh nothing, just a rat called Rolo with a teeny-tiny pancake.

Happy Pancake Day one and all!

Source: http://mashable.com/

Puppy or Bagel? Chihuahua or Muffin? Shiba or Marshmallow? (8 photos)

Is this a puppy or bagel? The question was posed by Karen Zack (@teenybiscuit) on Twitter and was accompanied by a gallery of photos that humorously brought attention to the striking similarities.

The tweet went viral and Karen has since followed up her now Internet famous image with more comparisons between various dog breeds and foods. She has even added a few new animals to the mix like birds and shrews.

The Internet is having a field day with these and her images have garnered her a ton of media attention. For more fun and quirkiness from Karen, check her out at the links below.

Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

What Top Chefs Cook for Their Dogs

Chefs want us to enjoy their food and are picky about what they serve. An intimate knowledge of ingredients, produce and provenance means they’re more likely to scrutinize what they feed their pup.

So what do they prepare for their four-legged diners? We asked them.

Andrew J. Scott |

Dave, seven, is a cross between a rough-coated Terrier and a Shih Tzu and is owned by Andrew Scott.
Source: Andrew Scott

Dave, seven, is a cross between a rough-coated Terrier and a Shih Tzu. He has a discriminating palate. “We try to do special stuff for him,” says chef Scott. “For his birthday, we did a trio of fish: salmon, cod and tuna, baked in the oven in tinfoil parcels. He prefers fish to meat, especially oily fish. We also made him a birthday cake with special doggy ingredients. He also enjoys turkey mince with a little cheese sprinkled on top, or scrambled egg and rice when he is poorly. He is so fussy, he can spot anything cheap.”

Monica Galetti |

Monica Galetti with her dogs Fynn and Cole.
Source: Monica Galetti

Monica Galetti, best known as a judge on MasterChef: The Professionals, owns two dogs: Fynn, a three-year-old brindle Boxer; and Cole, a French Bulldog pup. Both enjoy a sweet treat.

“I freeze them bananas and they love it,” she says. “Sometimes I poach chicken breast to give them a change from dog food. They can smell it and sit there waiting for it. If I am making myself a hard-boiled egg, the boys have one each. They also love apples if I am having some for breakfast.”

Mark Birchall |

Chef Birchall owns a 20-month-old chocolate Labrador called Reggie who enjoys an unusual treat.

“I feed Reggie regular dog food for most meals, but he gets a deer antler to chew on as a special treat,” Birchall says. “It relieves the boredom and the antlers are a great source of calcium and phosphorus. He likes roast chicken or roast beef, too. He loves it. He will eat anything we eat: potatoes, roast carrots, braised cabbage, broccoli.”

Richard Turner |

Richard Turner with his dog Buster.
Photographer: Paul Winch-Furness

Richard Turner’s four-year-old is a Pitbull crossed with a Rottweiler who goes by the name of Buster. He’s pretty easy-going but he does have a favorite treat.

“He really likes kefir fermented milk,” says chef and butcher Turner. “I make it for him. You take kefir grains, cover with milk and leave at room temperature for a couple of days. He likes it just as it is, but he is the least fussy dog in the world. We also give him fancy dog food called John Burns. We were advised to get it by a police dog handler. He also likes bone marrow, because I am a butcher.”

Paul Ainsworth |

Chef Ainsworth has one rule for the diet of his four-year-old Border Terrier, Flossie: She doesn’t get conventional dog food.

“We changed her diet about two years ago and usually give her lots of raw meat and vegetables,” he says. “As a treat, her absolute favorite is non-spicy chorizo cut up really small with scrambled eggs. She loves it. She’ll also eat what we are eating: Chicken, rabbit, duck. She’s not massive on lamb so we stay away from red meat. Also, loads of broccoli, carrots mixed really finely. She also likes Sea Jerky dried fish skins, the smellier the better.”

Angela Hartnett |

Otis is a three-year-old beagle owned by Angela Hartnett.
Photographer: Photographer: Richard Vines/Bloomberg

Otis, Angela Hartnett’s three-year-old Beagle, has an eating disorder: He compulsively hides his food.

“If we give him a bone or some other treat, he’ll either hide it around the house or bury it in a hole in the garden,” she says. “Dogs are like humans. They are what they eat. Otis was behaving badly and we took him to a trainer who said that feeding him dried food was like giving him crack cocaine. So we switched to Luna & Me, which are frozen patties of raw meat. But he doesn’t always behave, still. I served a steamed treacle pudding the other day, which he sniffed, knocked it off the table and consumed in a minute, the whole lot.”

Henry Harris |

Percy, a six-month-old Cocker Spaniel, has a sophisticated palate.

“He is rather partial to roast chicken or lovely pink-and-white fish sticks,” chef Harris says. “In the main, we buy a kibble that we moisten with warm water or occasionally a light stock. He definitely prefers stock. He is fine with chicken or beef or fish. He’s also partial to buttered asparagus. We were eating it the other day and he jumped up and yanked it off someone’s plate. He won’t be getting that again soon.”

Eric Chavot |

The French chef’s Cocker Spaniel Solo gets poached chicken every day, with no seasoning or sauce. “He absolutely loves it,” Chavot says. “Being the dog of a chef, it is very difficult for him because we cook wonderful things for us, and he knows. You can see his little nose analyzing everything. And he doesn’t want to be on the ground. He wants to be up on a chair, seeing everything that you do.”

Daniel Clifford |

The two-Michelin star British chef knows all about feeding dogs. “In France, it was my job to cook for a chef’s Labrador,” Clifford says. “He’d eat a fillet of beef that had to be sauteed. It was glazed in veal stock and you had to add potatoes and carrots.” Clifford’s own Bulldogs, Clifford and Winstone, enjoy nothing more than a Sunday roast but he won’t let them have cauliflower or broccoli because they aggravate their flatulence. They are also partial to a bowl of boiled rice, roasted marrow bones and anything from the restaurant.

Albert Roux |

Albert Roux and his dog, Canelou.
Photographer: Alice Cottle/Bloomberg

Canelou, a four-year-old-Labrador, loves beef Wellington. At least, I hope she does. When I invited her owner, chef Albert Roux, to Bob Bob Ricard restaurant for lunch recently, he took a large part of our £89 ($120) dish home for her. “Every time I have a lunch like today’s, I always leave a little bit for her,” he says. “When I go back, I say, ‘What have I got for you, darling?’ I love my dog. I call her my mistress, because when my wife is away, she jumps onto the bed, puts her head on the pillow and sleeps all night.”

Theo Randall |

The British chef’s Labrador twins, Maude and Evie, aged five, will eat anything, from chili to raw garlic. “Whenever I am cooking, they lie on the floor for any scrap,” Randall says. But their regular diet is Basil’s Dog Food, a raw mash up of meat, vegetables and ground bones, all from British farms.

    Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/

    A nice bit of squirrel: should we chow down a diet of invasive species?

    Last year, the Shambala festival made headlines by going meat-free. This year, it relaxed the rules for a feast of grey squirrel skewers and crayfish. Should the rest of us follow suit?

    At Shambala festival, during the hottest bank holiday on record, peace and love is about to turn sour. I am standing next to author Louise Gray, who is here to talk about wild alternatives to mass-produced meat. The cricket brownies are baked; we have been skinning squirrels and marinating them in satay, then decided to unwind by checking out a punk-reggae band in a nearby tent. That is when the singer announces his feelings about her presence there. Last year this festival was 100% meat- and fish-free. Now theyre saying we should eat pests and squirrels, he spits. Its 2017. If youre still eating the dead bodies of animals, you need to check your fucking privilege. The crowd cheers. I am worried we are about to be ethically eaten alive.

    In the wake of The Ethical Carnivore, her award-winning account of the year she spent eating roadkill and animals she had killed herself, and investigating abattoirs, Gray received death threats and abuse. Images spring to mind of balaclava-clad activists chucking red paint and righteous invective. If it comes down to it, I am not with you, I tell her, gallantly.

    If
    If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    The friction is hardly surprising. Shambala is a hippy sort of place, with as many recycling points as there are naked people painted blue, which is a lot. Ravers have to carry their own cups, and food stalls are entirely vegetarian. On the festivals Facebook page, protests over Grays talk quickly escalated into an argument about speciesism, human immigration and genocide. Onstage at the Garden o Feeden the festivals food and debate tent the edginess is palpable.

    Lets hear her out and fight afterwards, the host pleads. In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide.

    The debate around eating meat is hard to progress intellectually you either believe on some level that it is a natural part of the cycle of life, or an unnecessary moral wrong. Gray, the daughter of a farmer, is here to argue for an ecological, flexitarian position between the two.

    Our current production model is energy-intensive, wasteful, cruel and unsustainable. We should be eating far less meat, and thinking more about it. Her book describes the year she spent eating only animals she had killed herself a common, if hypothetical, answer to the abstraction and scale of the mostly invisible meat industry. She cried after killing the first rabbit, and talks about her ambivalence at stalking and shooting a red stag. The responsibility of taking an animals life bears an emotional cost, she tells the crowd. Its pretty intense. It is also not something one can practically do in a city (unless you maybe fancy the urban equivalent of turducken, eating a fox that recently swallowed a pigeon, which last dined on KFC).

    Yet there is a lesser explored alternative to factory meat, besides insects, roadkill or hunting your own: a diet of invasive species. I know whats coming: backstage I watched Gray skinning a bag of grey squirrels, carefully stripping pelts from flesh, cleaning out shot and slicing meat from bone. Several vegan chefs walked past, all of them fascinated, though one declared: Bit Hunger Games, innit? Or Winters Bone. Something with Jennifer Lawrence. Christ, I wish I hadnt seen that. She means the flayed legs of the skinned critter in front of her, rather than the film.

    Out front, Grays cousin has been standing sidestage to provide security/hand out brownies. She presents us with a plate of grilled sticky squirrel skewers, which are passed around. I try one, then a few. Surprisingly, many others in the crowd do the same. The plates disappear. The flavour is potently gamey, not a bad accompaniment to the zesty lime and creamy satay. I have certainly eaten worse on a cheap pizza. The hair that sticks to my teeth is off-putting, though.

    These squirrels are from Dumfries and Galloway, home to one of the few surviving red squirrel populations in the country, maintained by controlling greys. If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. They are wild, organic and definitely free range. As with insects, the ick factor might just be something we have to get past.

    This is the part of the message Crayfish Bob Ring has been trying to get out. A grizzled trapper of 15 years experience, I met him earlier at a picnic table outside the tent, smoking a roll-up pensively and squinting like Captain Quint. His passion is removing American crayfish from British waters and selling them at his restaurant pop-ups. The lobster-like signal crayfish were introduced in the 1970s to be a lucrative export to the Scandinavian market (which was soon dominated by cheaper imports of Chinese crayfish). The collapse of the scheme saw them escaping the fisheries, passing a deadly plague on to smaller, native white-clawed crayfish and destroying their numbers. The voracious predators eat fish and amphibian eggs, out-compete other species for habitat and burrow into river banks, causing their erosion and collapse. Crayfish Bob describes how they travel the country using the waterways, by hanging on to barges. I feel very conscious Im wearing a tutu.

    Ive gone into this business with the objective of going bust due to lack of stock, he says vehemently. I would get so much satisfaction from getting rid of them. Neither Gray nor Crayfish Bob think eating grey squirrels or signal crayfish would make a dent in their numbers the species are here to stay, and their realistic concern is to level the ecological balance. The EU list 37 alien invasive species, including muntjack deer, Ruddy duck and Siberian chipmunk. Legally, the crayfish have to be controlled anyway, Ring reminds me, so are not being bred or killed primarily to be eaten. After he realised the scale of the problem, he founded the National Institute of Crayfish Trappers, and became Crayfish Bob, selling gumbos and crawfish boil. Ive had vegetarians come up to me and say: What you are doing challenges all the reasons I became vegetarian. They see it as a way they can eat some fish.

    In
    In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    Of course, vegetarians who feel killing animals for any reason is wrong wont be convinced. Back in the tent, Dr Amelia Roberts, a member of Animal Aid and an animal rights advocate, is pushing back on a number of Grays points. Like many, she believes the American grey has been scape-squirreled. She cites evidence that the decline of their red cousins is mostly due to loss of habitat, a problem caused by people. And the fact is all invasive species were brought here by humans, something the rhetoric of the argument tends to obscure. Nonetheless, she says she agrees with 90% of what Gray has been saying, which seems positive.

    After a lot of whoops and applause, Gray is relieved the talk has gone down well, like the satay. I am surprised when she announces that the festival should be totally vegan next year Its the most inspiring thing they could do.

    She is all for people eating better meat, speaking to livestock farmers and being more conscientious. But she wryly acknowledges the difficulty in being an ethical meat-eater, especially in a market-led society that makes it difficult. You cant poke around peoples houses when you go around for dinner, or ask them to pick the label out of the bin. It is probably easier to just be vegetarian.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    Heinz’s ‘Weiner Stampede’ Super Bowl ad is full of dogs dressed as hot dogs

    Heinz’s latestKetchup commercial is like an extra side of adorableness.

    The condiment giant’s Super Bowl 50ad treats us to a stampede of wiener dogs dressed up as actual wieners (meaning hot dogs, not the other kind; get your mind out of the gutter). You’ll squeal in delight as you watch these pooches run through a picturesque fieldstraight into the arms of a condiment family. Because nothing goes together quite like mustard and ketchup on top of a hot dog.

    You know what they say, man’s best friend is a hot dog.

    Screenshot viaHeinz Ketchup/YouTube

    Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

    21 Adorable Animals That Are STILL In Food Comas After Thanksgiving

    Thanksgiving just isn’t Thanksgiving unless half of those at the table end up on the couch in a deep, jolly, sometimes painful, food coma. The struggle couldn’t be more real to get up and make it to a bed for the night…especially since in a few hours, you’ll eat even more. Because, Thanksgiving!

    But us humans aren’t the only ones who get tummies so round and eyelids so heavy from all those yummy sides. No, our pets know just how we feel…

    1. After all, they do lay the guilt trips on thick to get some scraps.

    2. When this face pops up under the table…it’s impossible to say no.

    3. “Please, sir, can I have some more?”

    4. Sometimes the coma is so deep, you wake up in dangerous positions.

    5. Or with awkward facial expressions…

    6. “Make the pain go away.”

    7. “I give up!”

    8. If you’re lucky, you make it to bed.

    9. She feels like garbage, so this is appropriate.

    10. Sometimes, you just have to let it all hang out.

    11. “There’s no shame in my Thanksgiving game.”

    12. “I made it upright again! Do I get a treat for that?”

    13. “We’ll make it through this together!” “Get your own bed.”

    14. A coma cuddle buddy always makes the trying time easier.

    15. It’s a bird…it’s a plane…no, it’s just a ginormous rabbit in a food coma!

    16. Puppy’s first Thanksgiving:

    17. And don’t be mistaken, they don’t get smarter with age. Food comas hit everyone hard.

    18. He saved some stuffing for later…this is him trying to get the last bits off his chin.

    19. “WHAT HAVE I DONE?”

    A photo posted by Lilly (@lilly_crazyeyes) on

    20. After a certain period of time, the resemblance is uncanny.

    21. “I can barely remember a time when I wasn’t this full…”

    It’s okay, guys, I feel you.

    Source: http://www.viralnova.com

    Farmers must stop antibiotics use in animals due to human health risk, warns WHO

    Overuse of antibiotics in animals is contributing to growing drug resistance in humans with serious health implications, says global health body

    Farmers must be prevented from using powerful antibiotics on animals reared for food, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned, because of the serious risks to human health that result.

    New guidelines from the global body suggest farmers should stop using any antibiotics routinely to promote growth and prevent disease in animals that are otherwise healthy, a common practice in some parts of the world, including Asia and the US. Such routine use is banned in Europe, though campaigners fear the rules are sometimes flouted.

    Using antimicrobial medicines on farm animals is one of the leading causes of the rise of superbugs, resistant to all but the strongest antibiotics. Medical authorities warn that the antibiotics available to treat even relatively minor human diseases are running out because of the rapid rise of such resistance.

    Dame Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England, has warned repeatedly that, a decade from now, even routine, previously low-risk operations, such as hip replacements, may become dangerous because of the risk of infections resistant to medicines.

    The WHO reported on Tuesday that in some countries, as much as 80% of antibiotic use is on farm animals. Even in some countries where routine use for enhancing growth is banned, more antibiotics are used on animals than on humans.

    The use of the strongest antibiotics, a last resort for the most deadly infections affecting humans, should be banned altogether in animals, the guidelines advise. This should apply, according to the WHO, even in cases where an illness has been diagnosed in a food-producing animal. Implementing this could require animals to be quarantined, allowed to die, or for herds to be culled in order to halt the spread of a serious disease rather than attempting to cure it.

    This recommendation is likely to be unpopular with farmers, who could risk financial loss, but is crucial to protect human health, according to the WHO, because the use of such antibiotics in animals is leading to increased resistance even to last-resort medicines, to the despair of doctors.

    However, the WHO has no power to enforce its guidelines, which are up to national governments to accept or reject.

    The forthright warning comes as new research, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, showed that restricting antibiotic use on farms reduced the antibiotic-resistant bacteria in farm animals by up to 39%. The WHO said it had used the research to inform its new guidelines.

    Restricting our remaining effective antibiotics for human use is crucial because of the lack of alternatives available. There are very few promising options in the research pipeline for new antibiotics to replace those that are becoming ineffective because of overuse and resistance, the WHO warned.

    Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the WHO, said: A lack of effective antibiotics is as serious a security threat as a sudden and deadly disease outbreak. Strong, sustained action across all sectors is vital if we are to turn back the tide of antimicrobial resistance and keep the world safe.

    Animal herds treated with antibiotics can develop bacteria resistant to the drugs, and pass this on to humans directly, through contact with farm workers, or through food. A Guardian investigation found that the superbug MRSA was found in a significant sample of pork products on the UKs supermarket shelves, risking humans becoming infected with the strain.

    Kazuaki Miyagishima, director of food safety at the WHO, said the links between antibiotic use on farms and risks to human health were clear: Scientific evidence demonstrates that overuse of antibiotics in animals can contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The volume of antibiotics used in animals is continuing to increase worldwide, driven by a growing demand for foods of animal origin, often produced through intensive animal husbandry.

    Dr Clare Chandler of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine said: This is a welcome set of recommendations from WHO. It will be a challenge for producers to follow these recommendations to reduce antibiotic use, but possible for larger scale producers with good biosecurity. Many smaller scale farmers around the world are dependent upon antibiotics to supplement animal feed, and actions will be needed to support them to make this change which will affect their lives and livelihoods.

    The Guardian, in a joint investigation with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, also found a rapid increase in the number of megafarms in the UK. Megafarms across the globe are on the rise, and they have been linked with antibiotic resistance, as whole herds of many hundreds of animals are often treated at once.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    Puppy or Bagel? Chihuahua or Muffin? Shiba or Marshmallow? (8 photos)

    Is this a puppy or bagel? The question was posed by Karen Zack (@teenybiscuit) on Twitter and was accompanied by a gallery of photos that humorously brought attention to the striking similarities.

    The tweet went viral and Karen has since followed up her now Internet famous image with more comparisons between various dog breeds and foods. She has even added a few new animals to the mix like birds and shrews.

    The Internet is having a field day with these and her images have garnered her a ton of media attention. For more fun and quirkiness from Karen, check her out at the links below.

    Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

    Smucker to Buy Rachael Ray Dog Food Brand in $1.9 Billion Deal

    • Food giant expanding in growing premium pet-products market
    • Company also confirms it will explore sale of U.S. baking unit

    J.M. Smucker Co. agreed to buy Ainsworth Pet Nutrition in a deal valued at $1.9 billion, betting that pet food can help reinvigorate sales in a sluggish consumer-product industry.

    The transaction, which gives Smucker a brand of premium dog and cat food backed by celebrity chef Rachael Ray, will amount to about $1.7 billion when excluding a $200 million tax benefit. The company also confirmed that it’s exploring the sale of its U.S. baking unit, which generates roughly $370 million in annual sales.

    Under Chief Executive Officer Mark Smucker, who became the fifth generation of his family to run the business when he took over in 2016, the company has tried to take the pet business more upscale. High-end pet food has surged 33 percent industrywide over the past five years and now accounts for more than 50 percent of the market. Consumers are shelling out more money for specialty diets, part of a trend known as “humanization.” Ainsworth generates about two-thirds of its sales from its Rachel Ray Nutrish brand.

    “The humanization trend is here to stay,” the CEO said in an interview. “This brand fits exactly where we need it to — it’s very important to continue to gain scale where it’s relevant.”

    Bake Sale

    In addition to the Ainsworth acquisition, Orrville, Ohio-based Smucker said it’s looking at a potential sale of the U.S. baking unit as it reshapes its portfolio to focus on coffee, pet products and snacks. The division includes brands like Pillsbury, Martha White, Hungry Jack and Jim Dandy. Bloomberg reported last month that the operation could fetch as much as $700 million in a sale, citing people familiar with the situation.

    Smucker generates about 85 percent of its revenue in the U.S. and the acquisition of Ainsworth will make pet food its largest business unit, accounting for about $3 billion in sales.

    Smucker is the latest food company to tap into the upscale pet market. General Mills Inc., mired in a three-year sales slump, agreed in February to buy Blue Buffalo Pet Products Inc. for about $8 billion.

    Pet products also give packaged-food companies a way to access the growth of e-commerce, a key initiative in the industry as Walmart Inc. and Kroger Co. ramp up the delivery of groceries in the aftermath of Amazon.com Inc.’s acquisition of Whole Foods Market.

    Online sales currently only account for about 3 percent of Smucker’s business. But the category is growing fast: In the first three quarters of the current fiscal year, pet sales through e-commerce have surged 70 percent, according to the company.

    “As consumers shift online, we have to get our fair share,” Mark Smucker said.

    Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/

    A nice bit of squirrel: should we chow down a diet of invasive species?

    Last year, the Shambala festival made headlines by going meat-free. This year, it relaxed the rules for a feast of grey squirrel skewers and crayfish. Should the rest of us follow suit?

    At Shambala festival, during the hottest bank holiday on record, peace and love is about to turn sour. I am standing next to author Louise Gray, who is here to talk about wild alternatives to mass-produced meat. The cricket brownies are baked; we have been skinning squirrels and marinating them in satay, then decided to unwind by checking out a punk-reggae band in a nearby tent. That is when the singer announces his feelings about her presence there. Last year this festival was 100% meat- and fish-free. Now theyre saying we should eat pests and squirrels, he spits. Its 2017. If youre still eating the dead bodies of animals, you need to check your fucking privilege. The crowd cheers. I am worried we are about to be ethically eaten alive.

    In the wake of The Ethical Carnivore, her award-winning account of the year she spent eating roadkill and animals she had killed herself, and investigating abattoirs, Gray received death threats and abuse. Images spring to mind of balaclava-clad activists chucking red paint and righteous invective. If it comes down to it, I am not with you, I tell her, gallantly.

    If
    If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    The friction is hardly surprising. Shambala is a hippy sort of place, with as many recycling points as there are naked people painted blue, which is a lot. Ravers have to carry their own cups, and food stalls are entirely vegetarian. On the festivals Facebook page, protests over Grays talk quickly escalated into an argument about speciesism, human immigration and genocide. Onstage at the Garden o Feeden the festivals food and debate tent the edginess is palpable.

    Lets hear her out and fight afterwards, the host pleads. In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide.

    The debate around eating meat is hard to progress intellectually you either believe on some level that it is a natural part of the cycle of life, or an unnecessary moral wrong. Gray, the daughter of a farmer, is here to argue for an ecological, flexitarian position between the two.

    Our current production model is energy-intensive, wasteful, cruel and unsustainable. We should be eating far less meat, and thinking more about it. Her book describes the year she spent eating only animals she had killed herself a common, if hypothetical, answer to the abstraction and scale of the mostly invisible meat industry. She cried after killing the first rabbit, and talks about her ambivalence at stalking and shooting a red stag. The responsibility of taking an animals life bears an emotional cost, she tells the crowd. Its pretty intense. It is also not something one can practically do in a city (unless you maybe fancy the urban equivalent of turducken, eating a fox that recently swallowed a pigeon, which last dined on KFC).

    Yet there is a lesser explored alternative to factory meat, besides insects, roadkill or hunting your own: a diet of invasive species. I know whats coming: backstage I watched Gray skinning a bag of grey squirrels, carefully stripping pelts from flesh, cleaning out shot and slicing meat from bone. Several vegan chefs walked past, all of them fascinated, though one declared: Bit Hunger Games, innit? Or Winters Bone. Something with Jennifer Lawrence. Christ, I wish I hadnt seen that. She means the flayed legs of the skinned critter in front of her, rather than the film.

    Out front, Grays cousin has been standing sidestage to provide security/hand out brownies. She presents us with a plate of grilled sticky squirrel skewers, which are passed around. I try one, then a few. Surprisingly, many others in the crowd do the same. The plates disappear. The flavour is potently gamey, not a bad accompaniment to the zesty lime and creamy satay. I have certainly eaten worse on a cheap pizza. The hair that sticks to my teeth is off-putting, though.

    These squirrels are from Dumfries and Galloway, home to one of the few surviving red squirrel populations in the country, maintained by controlling greys. If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. They are wild, organic and definitely free range. As with insects, the ick factor might just be something we have to get past.

    This is the part of the message Crayfish Bob Ring has been trying to get out. A grizzled trapper of 15 years experience, I met him earlier at a picnic table outside the tent, smoking a roll-up pensively and squinting like Captain Quint. His passion is removing American crayfish from British waters and selling them at his restaurant pop-ups. The lobster-like signal crayfish were introduced in the 1970s to be a lucrative export to the Scandinavian market (which was soon dominated by cheaper imports of Chinese crayfish). The collapse of the scheme saw them escaping the fisheries, passing a deadly plague on to smaller, native white-clawed crayfish and destroying their numbers. The voracious predators eat fish and amphibian eggs, out-compete other species for habitat and burrow into river banks, causing their erosion and collapse. Crayfish Bob describes how they travel the country using the waterways, by hanging on to barges. I feel very conscious Im wearing a tutu.

    Ive gone into this business with the objective of going bust due to lack of stock, he says vehemently. I would get so much satisfaction from getting rid of them. Neither Gray nor Crayfish Bob think eating grey squirrels or signal crayfish would make a dent in their numbers the species are here to stay, and their realistic concern is to level the ecological balance. The EU list 37 alien invasive species, including muntjack deer, Ruddy duck and Siberian chipmunk. Legally, the crayfish have to be controlled anyway, Ring reminds me, so are not being bred or killed primarily to be eaten. After he realised the scale of the problem, he founded the National Institute of Crayfish Trappers, and became Crayfish Bob, selling gumbos and crawfish boil. Ive had vegetarians come up to me and say: What you are doing challenges all the reasons I became vegetarian. They see it as a way they can eat some fish.

    In
    In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    Of course, vegetarians who feel killing animals for any reason is wrong wont be convinced. Back in the tent, Dr Amelia Roberts, a member of Animal Aid and an animal rights advocate, is pushing back on a number of Grays points. Like many, she believes the American grey has been scape-squirreled. She cites evidence that the decline of their red cousins is mostly due to loss of habitat, a problem caused by people. And the fact is all invasive species were brought here by humans, something the rhetoric of the argument tends to obscure. Nonetheless, she says she agrees with 90% of what Gray has been saying, which seems positive.

    After a lot of whoops and applause, Gray is relieved the talk has gone down well, like the satay. I am surprised when she announces that the festival should be totally vegan next year Its the most inspiring thing they could do.

    She is all for people eating better meat, speaking to livestock farmers and being more conscientious. But she wryly acknowledges the difficulty in being an ethical meat-eater, especially in a market-led society that makes it difficult. You cant poke around peoples houses when you go around for dinner, or ask them to pick the label out of the bin. It is probably easier to just be vegetarian.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    The Internet loves cats staring at food, but not enough to share a bite

    Some people have Instagram accounts; others have year-long visual narratives about tempting food and the cats who want to eat it. Two couples have recently received attention for their photo journals of kitties who yearn to sink their little fangs into every dish their jerk humans cook. But, alas, they are cats, and must eat cat food only.

    One tabby sat patiently through every meal her parents ate at home last year. For the cat owners, it’s a document of delicious food shared in a loving life together. For kitty: an extended, unanswered plea. I’m hungry just looking at it, and I live on a strict diet of people-food.



    Even some wine would be nice, please. Anything that’s not an accursed kibble or bit!

    This persistent tabby found some public sympathy this weekfrom the animal lovers at The Dodo, but has yet to get what her heart truly desires: table scraps.

    She’s also not the first cat to be cut out of the sweet dinner action and photographed while piningit’s a trend. Check out these two Japanese cats who are taunted nightly by sumptuous fish, ramen, pastries, and even cat-shaped bento portraitsthe precise definition of “rubbing it in.”

    2 # # # # #cat # # # #

    A photo posted by naomiuno (@naomiuno) on

    # # #cat # #

    A photo posted by naomiuno (@naomiuno) on

    # # #cat # # #

    A photo posted by naomiuno (@naomiuno) on

    Well, at least they have each other.

    # # #cat # # #

    A photo posted by naomiuno (@naomiuno) on

    Naomiuno has posted nearly 5,000 photos, and nearly all depict her long-suffering cats. Truly, this is the most important thing on Instagram now.

    And until cats rise up and take their revenge for the countless times we’ve denied them the best treats, I’ll continue to think it’s extremely cute.

    Photo by naomiuno/Instagram

    Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

    North Atlantic right whales may face extinction after no new births recorded

    Declining fertility and rising mortality, exacerbated by fishing industry, prompts experts to warn whales could be extinct by 2040

    The dwindling North Atlantic right whale population is on track to finish its breeding season without any new births, prompting experts to warn again that without human intervention, the species will face extinction.

    Scientists observing the whale community off the US east coast have not recorded a single mother-calf pair this winter. Last year saw a record number of deaths in the population. Threats to the whales include entanglement in lobster fishing ropes and an increasing struggle to find food in abnormally warm waters.

    The combination of rising mortality and declining fertility is now seen as potentially catastrophic. There are estimated to be as few as 430 North Atlantic right whales left in the world, including just 100 potential mothers.

    At the rate we are killing them off, this 100 females will be gone in 20 years, said Mark Baumgartner, a marine ecologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. Without action, he warned, North Atlantic right whales will be functionally extinct by 2040.

    Quick guide

    Why are whales still endangered?

    Population recovery will take decades

    Commercial whaling on a large scale took place for three centuries until banned in 1986. Most whale populations had been reduced to such low levels that it will take decades for many of them to recover. Additional problems of entanglement, pollution, climate change and ship strikes are also curtailing their recovery.

    Other threatened species include: the vaquita, a rare species of porpoise found in the gulf of California and rated the most endangered cetacean in the world it is thought that only 30 or so remain in the wild; the blue whale, pictured, the largest animal ever known to have existed between 10,000 and 25,000 remain; and the sei whale, the third-largest whale, with a population of around 80,000.

    Photograph: Franco Banfi/WaterFrame RM

    A 10-year-old female was found dead off the Virginia coast in January, entangled in fishing gear, in the first recorded death of 2018. That followed a record 18 premature deaths in 2017, Baumgartner said.

    Woods Hole and other groups, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have been tracing right whale numbers in earnest since the mid-1980s.

    Federal research suggests 82% of premature deaths are caused by entanglement in fishing line. The prime culprit is the New England lobster industry. Crab fishing in Canadian waters is another cause of such deaths.

    A
    A lobster fisherman in Maine. Right whales can become entangled in the ropes used for fishing. Photograph: Daniel Grill/Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

    Baumgartner said that until about seven years ago, the population of North Atlantic right whales was healthy. But then lobster fishermen began greatly increasing the strength of ropes used to attach lobster pots to marker buoys.

    Whales becoming entangled are now far less able to break free, Baumgartner said. Some are killed outright, others cannot swim properly, causing them to starve or to lose so much blubber that females become infertile.

    Lobster and crab fishing and whales are able to comfortably co-exist, Baumgartner said. We are trying to propose solutions, its urgent.

    Baumgartner said the US government should intervene to regulate fishing gear. He also said the industry should explore technology enabling fishermen to track and gather lobster pots without using roped buoys.

    The whales migrate seasonally between New England and Florida, calving off Florida and Georgia from November to February. They primarily feed on phytoplankton. Scientists believe rapid warming of the Gulf of Maine, linked to climate change, is drastically depleting that food source.

    Past measures to prevent ship collisions and to safeguard feeding areas have helped. Several environmental groups have sued the federal government, demanding greater protection for right whales.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    Offended by Koreans eating dog? I trust youve never had a bacon butty | Chas Newkey-Burden

    Frightened animals being caged, killed and turned into food wed never dream of such evils in the western world, writes journalist and author Chas Newkey-Burden

    Offended by Koreans eating dog? I trust youve never had a bacon butty

    Frightened animals being caged, killed and turned into food wed never dream of such evils in the west would we?

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    21 Adorable Animals That Are STILL In Food Comas After Thanksgiving

    Thanksgiving just isn’t Thanksgiving unless half of those at the table end up on the couch in a deep, jolly, sometimes painful, food coma. The struggle couldn’t be more real to get up and make it to a bed for the night…especially since in a few hours, you’ll eat even more. Because, Thanksgiving!

    But us humans aren’t the only ones who get tummies so round and eyelids so heavy from all those yummy sides. No, our pets know just how we feel…

    1. After all, they do lay the guilt trips on thick to get some scraps.

    2. When this face pops up under the table…it’s impossible to say no.

    3. “Please, sir, can I have some more?”

    4. Sometimes the coma is so deep, you wake up in dangerous positions.

    5. Or with awkward facial expressions…

    6. “Make the pain go away.”

    7. “I give up!”

    8. If you’re lucky, you make it to bed.

    9. She feels like garbage, so this is appropriate.

    10. Sometimes, you just have to let it all hang out.

    11. “There’s no shame in my Thanksgiving game.”

    12. “I made it upright again! Do I get a treat for that?”

    13. “We’ll make it through this together!” “Get your own bed.”

    14. A coma cuddle buddy always makes the trying time easier.

    15. It’s a bird…it’s a plane…no, it’s just a ginormous rabbit in a food coma!

    16. Puppy’s first Thanksgiving:

    17. And don’t be mistaken, they don’t get smarter with age. Food comas hit everyone hard.

    18. He saved some stuffing for later…this is him trying to get the last bits off his chin.

    19. “WHAT HAVE I DONE?”

    A photo posted by Lilly (@lilly_crazyeyes) on

    20. After a certain period of time, the resemblance is uncanny.

    21. “I can barely remember a time when I wasn’t this full…”

    It’s okay, guys, I feel you.

    Source: http://www.viralnova.com

    Fireball gummy bears are like a shot of candy

    Image: etsy

    Getting drunk and eating candy are both two joys in life. Getting drunk by eating candy is pure bliss.

    While devouring sweetened alcohol in various jellied states is not a new invention, gummy bears infused with cinnamon whiskey is a welcome addition to booze and candy everywhere.

    Unfortunately, Haribo and Fireball have yet to strike some multimillion dollar deal to bring boozy gummies to a liquor store near you, but, perspective buyers can find a similar product on Etsy from the store VineGelee.

    While you’re likely unable to eat enough of these bears to get a good buzz, the resounding theme from the reviews is that they’re delicious, and they arrive in a timely manner and in great packaging.

    The bears are available by weight, starting at $9.95 plus shipping. And if Fireball whiskey isn’t your thing, the shop does take custom orders, if you prefer a specific type of booze.

    [h/t:Delish]

    Source: http://mashable.com/

    Farmers must stop antibiotics use in animals due to human health risk, warns WHO

    Overuse of antibiotics in animals is contributing to growing drug resistance in humans with serious health implications, says global health body

    Farmers must be prevented from using powerful antibiotics on animals reared for food, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned, because of the serious risks to human health that result.

    New guidelines from the global body suggest farmers should stop using any antibiotics routinely to promote growth and prevent disease in animals that are otherwise healthy, a common practice in some parts of the world, including Asia and the US. Such routine use is banned in Europe, though campaigners fear the rules are sometimes flouted.

    Using antimicrobial medicines on farm animals is one of the leading causes of the rise of superbugs, resistant to all but the strongest antibiotics. Medical authorities warn that the antibiotics available to treat even relatively minor human diseases are running out because of the rapid rise of such resistance.

    Dame Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England, has warned repeatedly that, a decade from now, even routine, previously low-risk operations, such as hip replacements, may become dangerous because of the risk of infections resistant to medicines.

    The WHO reported on Tuesday that in some countries, as much as 80% of antibiotic use is on farm animals. Even in some countries where routine use for enhancing growth is banned, more antibiotics are used on animals than on humans.

    The use of the strongest antibiotics, a last resort for the most deadly infections affecting humans, should be banned altogether in animals, the guidelines advise. This should apply, according to the WHO, even in cases where an illness has been diagnosed in a food-producing animal. Implementing this could require animals to be quarantined, allowed to die, or for herds to be culled in order to halt the spread of a serious disease rather than attempting to cure it.

    This recommendation is likely to be unpopular with farmers, who could risk financial loss, but is crucial to protect human health, according to the WHO, because the use of such antibiotics in animals is leading to increased resistance even to last-resort medicines, to the despair of doctors.

    However, the WHO has no power to enforce its guidelines, which are up to national governments to accept or reject.

    The forthright warning comes as new research, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, showed that restricting antibiotic use on farms reduced the antibiotic-resistant bacteria in farm animals by up to 39%. The WHO said it had used the research to inform its new guidelines.

    Restricting our remaining effective antibiotics for human use is crucial because of the lack of alternatives available. There are very few promising options in the research pipeline for new antibiotics to replace those that are becoming ineffective because of overuse and resistance, the WHO warned.

    Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the WHO, said: A lack of effective antibiotics is as serious a security threat as a sudden and deadly disease outbreak. Strong, sustained action across all sectors is vital if we are to turn back the tide of antimicrobial resistance and keep the world safe.

    Animal herds treated with antibiotics can develop bacteria resistant to the drugs, and pass this on to humans directly, through contact with farm workers, or through food. A Guardian investigation found that the superbug MRSA was found in a significant sample of pork products on the UKs supermarket shelves, risking humans becoming infected with the strain.

    Kazuaki Miyagishima, director of food safety at the WHO, said the links between antibiotic use on farms and risks to human health were clear: Scientific evidence demonstrates that overuse of antibiotics in animals can contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The volume of antibiotics used in animals is continuing to increase worldwide, driven by a growing demand for foods of animal origin, often produced through intensive animal husbandry.

    Dr Clare Chandler of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine said: This is a welcome set of recommendations from WHO. It will be a challenge for producers to follow these recommendations to reduce antibiotic use, but possible for larger scale producers with good biosecurity. Many smaller scale farmers around the world are dependent upon antibiotics to supplement animal feed, and actions will be needed to support them to make this change which will affect their lives and livelihoods.

    The Guardian, in a joint investigation with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, also found a rapid increase in the number of megafarms in the UK. Megafarms across the globe are on the rise, and they have been linked with antibiotic resistance, as whole herds of many hundreds of animals are often treated at once.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    Puppy or Bagel? Chihuahua or Muffin? Shiba or Marshmallow? (8 photos)

    Is this a puppy or bagel? The question was posed by Karen Zack (@teenybiscuit) on Twitter and was accompanied by a gallery of photos that humorously brought attention to the striking similarities.

    The tweet went viral and Karen has since followed up her now Internet famous image with more comparisons between various dog breeds and foods. She has even added a few new animals to the mix like birds and shrews.

    The Internet is having a field day with these and her images have garnered her a ton of media attention. For more fun and quirkiness from Karen, check her out at the links below.

    Source: http://twistedsifter.com/

    Here’s the least righteous recipe in the Ninja Turtles cookbook

    Time to get cooking!
    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    It’s scarfin’ time!

    Thanks to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Pizza Cookbook a collection of gnarly recipes inspired by the unique culinary preferences of everyone’s favorite crime-fighting turtles you too can now get a taste of what it’s like to live your worst life.

    Okay, that’s a bit harsh. There are some delicious-sounding classics, but the book includes a few seriously radical recipes that sound as though they might not be intended for human consumption.

    From pizzas to desserts, we surveyed the 65 TMNT-inspired creations to find the worst of the worst, and without a doubt we’ve concluded the gnarliest pizza concoction is none other than the very confusing Chocolate-Chili Pepper Pizza with Butternut Squash.

    Blech.

    Now in case the thought of chocolate combined with peppers and butternut squash didn’t send you sprinting to embrace your extra-large bottle of Tums, we’re here to enlighten you on a few other ingredients.

    Interesting…

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    To make this pizza even more appetizing, the recipe calls for two tablespoons of smooth, natural PEANUT BUTTER, a handful of corn tortilla chips, and a quarter cup of SOUR CREAM. Help.

    If that doesn’t appeal, adventurous eaters can also try recipes like the Deep-Dish Goulash Pizza, the Total Tuna Meltdown, or Pepperoni and Sweet Pickle Pie. Good luck.

    Deep-dish Goulash Pizza

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    Despite these creations, the book isn’t all that terrifying. The author, Peggy Paul Casella, is also the creator of ThursdayNightPizza.com, so she knows how to make a pretty good pie.

    There are some rockin’ desserts too, including a sweet s’mores pizza, and the Old School section features more traditional recipes like pepperoni or four-cheese. And despite the name, the snacks featured in the “Masked Mutations” section of the book also seem like a safe bet. We promise.

    Four Cheese Pizza

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    The book can be purchased on Amazon for about $20, so call up your Leonardos, Raphaels, Donatellos, and Michelangelos, and start cooking. Cowabunga!

    WATCH: This chocolate museum would even make Willy Wonka jealous

    Source: http://mashable.com/

    A nice bit of squirrel: should we chow down a diet of invasive species?

    Last year, the Shambala festival made headlines by going meat-free. This year, it relaxed the rules for a feast of grey squirrel skewers and crayfish. Should the rest of us follow suit?

    At Shambala festival, during the hottest bank holiday on record, peace and love is about to turn sour. I am standing next to author Louise Gray, who is here to talk about wild alternatives to mass-produced meat. The cricket brownies are baked; we have been skinning squirrels and marinating them in satay, then decided to unwind by checking out a punk-reggae band in a nearby tent. That is when the singer announces his feelings about her presence there. Last year this festival was 100% meat- and fish-free. Now theyre saying we should eat pests and squirrels, he spits. Its 2017. If youre still eating the dead bodies of animals, you need to check your fucking privilege. The crowd cheers. I am worried we are about to be ethically eaten alive.

    In the wake of The Ethical Carnivore, her award-winning account of the year she spent eating roadkill and animals she had killed herself, and investigating abattoirs, Gray received death threats and abuse. Images spring to mind of balaclava-clad activists chucking red paint and righteous invective. If it comes down to it, I am not with you, I tell her, gallantly.

    If
    If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    The friction is hardly surprising. Shambala is a hippy sort of place, with as many recycling points as there are naked people painted blue, which is a lot. Ravers have to carry their own cups, and food stalls are entirely vegetarian. On the festivals Facebook page, protests over Grays talk quickly escalated into an argument about speciesism, human immigration and genocide. Onstage at the Garden o Feeden the festivals food and debate tent the edginess is palpable.

    Lets hear her out and fight afterwards, the host pleads. In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide.

    The debate around eating meat is hard to progress intellectually you either believe on some level that it is a natural part of the cycle of life, or an unnecessary moral wrong. Gray, the daughter of a farmer, is here to argue for an ecological, flexitarian position between the two.

    Our current production model is energy-intensive, wasteful, cruel and unsustainable. We should be eating far less meat, and thinking more about it. Her book describes the year she spent eating only animals she had killed herself a common, if hypothetical, answer to the abstraction and scale of the mostly invisible meat industry. She cried after killing the first rabbit, and talks about her ambivalence at stalking and shooting a red stag. The responsibility of taking an animals life bears an emotional cost, she tells the crowd. Its pretty intense. It is also not something one can practically do in a city (unless you maybe fancy the urban equivalent of turducken, eating a fox that recently swallowed a pigeon, which last dined on KFC).

    Yet there is a lesser explored alternative to factory meat, besides insects, roadkill or hunting your own: a diet of invasive species. I know whats coming: backstage I watched Gray skinning a bag of grey squirrels, carefully stripping pelts from flesh, cleaning out shot and slicing meat from bone. Several vegan chefs walked past, all of them fascinated, though one declared: Bit Hunger Games, innit? Or Winters Bone. Something with Jennifer Lawrence. Christ, I wish I hadnt seen that. She means the flayed legs of the skinned critter in front of her, rather than the film.

    Out front, Grays cousin has been standing sidestage to provide security/hand out brownies. She presents us with a plate of grilled sticky squirrel skewers, which are passed around. I try one, then a few. Surprisingly, many others in the crowd do the same. The plates disappear. The flavour is potently gamey, not a bad accompaniment to the zesty lime and creamy satay. I have certainly eaten worse on a cheap pizza. The hair that sticks to my teeth is off-putting, though.

    These squirrels are from Dumfries and Galloway, home to one of the few surviving red squirrel populations in the country, maintained by controlling greys. If we want to eat meat, the argument to get it from animals such as grey squirrels is persuasive. They are wild, organic and definitely free range. As with insects, the ick factor might just be something we have to get past.

    This is the part of the message Crayfish Bob Ring has been trying to get out. A grizzled trapper of 15 years experience, I met him earlier at a picnic table outside the tent, smoking a roll-up pensively and squinting like Captain Quint. His passion is removing American crayfish from British waters and selling them at his restaurant pop-ups. The lobster-like signal crayfish were introduced in the 1970s to be a lucrative export to the Scandinavian market (which was soon dominated by cheaper imports of Chinese crayfish). The collapse of the scheme saw them escaping the fisheries, passing a deadly plague on to smaller, native white-clawed crayfish and destroying their numbers. The voracious predators eat fish and amphibian eggs, out-compete other species for habitat and burrow into river banks, causing their erosion and collapse. Crayfish Bob describes how they travel the country using the waterways, by hanging on to barges. I feel very conscious Im wearing a tutu.

    Ive gone into this business with the objective of going bust due to lack of stock, he says vehemently. I would get so much satisfaction from getting rid of them. Neither Gray nor Crayfish Bob think eating grey squirrels or signal crayfish would make a dent in their numbers the species are here to stay, and their realistic concern is to level the ecological balance. The EU list 37 alien invasive species, including muntjack deer, Ruddy duck and Siberian chipmunk. Legally, the crayfish have to be controlled anyway, Ring reminds me, so are not being bred or killed primarily to be eaten. After he realised the scale of the problem, he founded the National Institute of Crayfish Trappers, and became Crayfish Bob, selling gumbos and crawfish boil. Ive had vegetarians come up to me and say: What you are doing challenges all the reasons I became vegetarian. They see it as a way they can eat some fish.

    In
    In a craven attempt to fit in, I am wearing a full-length dress and Carmen Miranda fruit hat; Gray has nowhere to hide. Photograph: Dan Farrell

    Of course, vegetarians who feel killing animals for any reason is wrong wont be convinced. Back in the tent, Dr Amelia Roberts, a member of Animal Aid and an animal rights advocate, is pushing back on a number of Grays points. Like many, she believes the American grey has been scape-squirreled. She cites evidence that the decline of their red cousins is mostly due to loss of habitat, a problem caused by people. And the fact is all invasive species were brought here by humans, something the rhetoric of the argument tends to obscure. Nonetheless, she says she agrees with 90% of what Gray has been saying, which seems positive.

    After a lot of whoops and applause, Gray is relieved the talk has gone down well, like the satay. I am surprised when she announces that the festival should be totally vegan next year Its the most inspiring thing they could do.

    She is all for people eating better meat, speaking to livestock farmers and being more conscientious. But she wryly acknowledges the difficulty in being an ethical meat-eater, especially in a market-led society that makes it difficult. You cant poke around peoples houses when you go around for dinner, or ask them to pick the label out of the bin. It is probably easier to just be vegetarian.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/us

    Very Ethical: This Slaughterhouse Lets The Animals Get A Few Shots In Before They Kill Them

    Whether or not you eat meat, one thing everyone can agree on is that when animals are slaughtered for food, it should be done in an ethical manner that minimizes suffering and preserves the creatures dignity. Thats why one Nebraska-based farming company is introducing a humane new approach to slaughtering animals that could change the industry forever: letting the cows get in a few shots before they kill them.

    Yup. Fairview Farms Inc., an Omaha slaughterhouse that raises and processes hundreds of cattle a year, is earning the praise of animal rights organizations and the meat industry alike for its unique new approach to ethical killing. Shortly before a cow is slaughtered, the animal is brought into a small outdoor pen where a Fairview employee in a padded protective bodysuit is waiting. There, the animal is permitted to kick or headbutt the employee as much as it pleases during a two-minute window. If the cow doesnt immediately seem interested in doling out punishment to its human handler, its encouraged to do so through a couple whacks to the ribs with a Wiffle ball bat, or, if that fails, a firm pinch on the tail with a pair of pliers.

    After the cow has knocked around its handler for a while, the employee lies down on the ground in faux defeat, and enthusiastic mooing sounds play over a loudspeaker to give the animal the illusion that its being cheered on by its bovine peers. Then, the cowstill blissful from having battered a humanis led into a metal squeeze chute where a heavy steel bolt is driven into its brain with a powerful blast of compressed air, killing the animal instantly and painlessly.

    It slows down our facilitys output a bit, but we just want to make sure the cows get to have a little fun before they die, says Fairview Farms CEO Ben Jacobson about the humane new slaughtering practice. When theyre kicking you around, theyre like little kids on Christmas. And we think thats the least we can do for them to make their final moments special.

    Wow! Even if you dont eat meat, youve got to admit that this is a pretty awesome and thoughtful way to show these animals respect before theyre slaughtered. Truly, theyre going out on a high note!

    Source: http://www.clickhole.com/features/news/

    21 Adorable Animals That Are STILL In Food Comas After Thanksgiving

    Thanksgiving just isn’t Thanksgiving unless half of those at the table end up on the couch in a deep, jolly, sometimes painful, food coma. The struggle couldn’t be more real to get up and make it to a bed for the night…especially since in a few hours, you’ll eat even more. Because, Thanksgiving!

    But us humans aren’t the only ones who get tummies so round and eyelids so heavy from all those yummy sides. No, our pets know just how we feel…

    1. After all, they do lay the guilt trips on thick to get some scraps.

    2. When this face pops up under the table…it’s impossible to say no.

    3. “Please, sir, can I have some more?”

    4. Sometimes the coma is so deep, you wake up in dangerous positions.

    5. Or with awkward facial expressions…

    6. “Make the pain go away.”

    7. “I give up!”

    8. If you’re lucky, you make it to bed.

    9. She feels like garbage, so this is appropriate.

    10. Sometimes, you just have to let it all hang out.

    11. “There’s no shame in my Thanksgiving game.”

    12. “I made it upright again! Do I get a treat for that?”

    13. “We’ll make it through this together!” “Get your own bed.”

    14. A coma cuddle buddy always makes the trying time easier.

    15. It’s a bird…it’s a plane…no, it’s just a ginormous rabbit in a food coma!

    16. Puppy’s first Thanksgiving:

    17. And don’t be mistaken, they don’t get smarter with age. Food comas hit everyone hard.

    18. He saved some stuffing for later…this is him trying to get the last bits off his chin.

    19. “WHAT HAVE I DONE?”

    A photo posted by Lilly (@lilly_crazyeyes) on

    20. After a certain period of time, the resemblance is uncanny.

    21. “I can barely remember a time when I wasn’t this full…”

    It’s okay, guys, I feel you.

    Source: http://www.viralnova.com

    Heinz’s ‘Weiner Stampede’ Super Bowl ad is full of dogs dressed as hot dogs

    Heinz’s latestKetchup commercial is like an extra side of adorableness.

    The condiment giant’s Super Bowl 50ad treats us to a stampede of wiener dogs dressed up as actual wieners (meaning hot dogs, not the other kind; get your mind out of the gutter). You’ll squeal in delight as you watch these pooches run through a picturesque fieldstraight into the arms of a condiment family. Because nothing goes together quite like mustard and ketchup on top of a hot dog.

    You know what they say, man’s best friend is a hot dog.

    Screenshot viaHeinz Ketchup/YouTube

    Source: http://www.dailydot.com/

    Here’s the least righteous recipe in the Ninja Turtles cookbook

    Time to get cooking!
    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    It’s scarfin’ time!

    Thanks to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Pizza Cookbook a collection of gnarly recipes inspired by the unique culinary preferences of everyone’s favorite crime-fighting turtles you too can now get a taste of what it’s like to live your worst life.

    Okay, that’s a bit harsh. There are some delicious-sounding classics, but the book includes a few seriously radical recipes that sound as though they might not be intended for human consumption.

    From pizzas to desserts, we surveyed the 65 TMNT-inspired creations to find the worst of the worst, and without a doubt we’ve concluded the gnarliest pizza concoction is none other than the very confusing Chocolate-Chili Pepper Pizza with Butternut Squash.

    Blech.

    Now in case the thought of chocolate combined with peppers and butternut squash didn’t send you sprinting to embrace your extra-large bottle of Tums, we’re here to enlighten you on a few other ingredients.

    Interesting…

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    To make this pizza even more appetizing, the recipe calls for two tablespoons of smooth, natural PEANUT BUTTER, a handful of corn tortilla chips, and a quarter cup of SOUR CREAM. Help.

    If that doesn’t appeal, adventurous eaters can also try recipes like the Deep-Dish Goulash Pizza, the Total Tuna Meltdown, or Pepperoni and Sweet Pickle Pie. Good luck.

    Deep-dish Goulash Pizza

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    Despite these creations, the book isn’t all that terrifying. The author, Peggy Paul Casella, is also the creator of ThursdayNightPizza.com, so she knows how to make a pretty good pie.

    There are some rockin’ desserts too, including a sweet s’mores pizza, and the Old School section features more traditional recipes like pepperoni or four-cheese. And despite the name, the snacks featured in the “Masked Mutations” section of the book also seem like a safe bet. We promise.

    Four Cheese Pizza

    Image: Haley Hamblin/mashable

    The book can be purchased on Amazon for about $20, so call up your Leonardos, Raphaels, Donatellos, and Michelangelos, and start cooking. Cowabunga!

    WATCH: This chocolate museum would even make Willy Wonka jealous

    Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/10/teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-pizza-cookbook/

    Very Ethical: This Slaughterhouse Lets The Animals Get A Few Shots In Before They Kill Them

    Whether or not you eat meat, one thing everyone can agree on is that when animals are slaughtered for food, it should be done in an ethical manner that minimizes suffering and preserves the creatures dignity. Thats why one Nebraska-based farming company is introducing a humane new approach to slaughtering animals that could change the industry forever: letting the cows get in a few shots before they kill them.

    Yup. Fairview Farms Inc., an Omaha slaughterhouse that raises and processes hundreds of cattle a year, is earning the praise of animal rights organizations and the meat industry alike for its unique new approach to ethical killing. Shortly before a cow is slaughtered, the animal is brought into a small outdoor pen where a Fairview employee in a padded protective bodysuit is waiting. There, the animal is permitted to kick or headbutt the employee as much as it pleases during a two-minute window. If the cow doesnt immediately seem interested in doling out punishment to its human handler, its encouraged to do so through a couple whacks to the ribs with a Wiffle ball bat, or, if that fails, a firm pinch on the tail with a pair of pliers.

    After the cow has knocked around its handler for a while, the employee lies down on the ground in faux defeat, and enthusiastic mooing sounds play over a loudspeaker to give the animal the illusion that its being cheered on by its bovine peers. Then, the cowstill blissful from having battered a humanis led into a metal squeeze chute where a heavy steel bolt is driven into its brain with a powerful blast of compressed air, killing the animal instantly and painlessly.

    It slows down our facilitys output a bit, but we just want to make sure the cows get to have a little fun before they die, says Fairview Farms CEO Ben Jacobson about the humane new slaughtering practice. When theyre kicking you around, theyre like little kids on Christmas. And we think thats the least we can do for them to make their final moments special.

    Wow! Even if you dont eat meat, youve got to admit that this is a pretty awesome and thoughtful way to show these animals respect before theyre slaughtered. Truly, theyre going out on a high note!

    Read more: http://www.clickhole.com/article/very-ethical-slaughterhouse-lets-animals-get-few-s-3445

    Puppy or Bagel? Chihuahua or Muffin? Shiba or Marshmallow? (8 photos)

    Is this a puppy or bagel? The question was posed by Karen Zack (@teenybiscuit) on Twitter and was accompanied by a gallery of photos that humorously brought attention to the striking similarities.

    The tweet went viral and Karen has since followed up her now Internet famous image with more comparisons between various dog breeds and foods. She has even added a few new animals to the mix like birds and shrews.

    The Internet is having a field day with these and her images have garnered her a ton of media attention. For more fun and quirkiness from Karen, check her out at the links below.

    Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/2016/03/puppy-or-bagel-meme-gallery/